Socrates1

This essay has a total of 608 words and 3 pages.

Socrates1





Philosophy is a vast field. It examines and probes many different fields. Virtue, morality,
immortality, death, and the difference between the psyche (soul) and the soma (body)
are just a few of the many different topics which can be covered under the umbrella of
philosophy. Philosophers are supposed to be experts on all these subjects. The have
well thought out opinions, and they are very learned people.

Among the most revered philosophers of all time was Socrates. Living around the 5th
century B.C., Socrates was among the first philosophers who wasn't a sophist, meaning
that he never felt that he was wise for he was always in the pursuit of knowledge.
Unfortunately, Socrates was put to death late in his life. One of his best students,
Plato, however, recorded what had occurred on that last day of Socrates' life. On that
last day of his life, Socrates made a quite powerful claim. He claimed that philosophy
was merely practice for getting used to death and dying.

At first, the connection between philosophy and death is not clear. However, as we
unravel Socrates' argument backing up his claim, the statement makes a lot of sense.
In order for Philosophers to examine their world accurately and learn the truth
Continues for 2 more pages >>




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