Steel drums Essay

This essay has a total of 426 words and 3 pages.

Steel drums

The recording I listened to is called Carnival Favorites. It is Caribbean steel drum
music. It is the majority of what people listen to and play in the Caribbean. It can be
related to the genre of music known as techno. Usually a basic beat is repeated while a
featured instrument such as steel drums plays a melody or song. Caribbean bands are mostly
comprised of a drum set player, steel drum player, and a guitar and bass player. Other
bands will add in other instruments such as a keyboard, bongos, or African drums. It is
played so that people will be entertained, is played to keep people's spirits high. Steel
drum music is also about dancing. Any song that is played you will most likely be able to
dance to it. The music makes you want to get into groove. Unless a band is playing a cover
song, the band might not have a singer. Steel drum bands, in particularly, use the steel
drums to "sing" to the audience. Steel drum players are fascinating to watch because of
how difficult it is to play, and players can play every note perfect in the steel pan with
ease.

It differs from any American music because there are usually not any words, and is
different from techno because the steel drum is used as a voice instead of a sound
machine. Most music that I listen to is based on the guitar and the vocalists. Being a
drummer makes me focus more on the drum parts, which is why I like steel drum bands
because they are percussion featured. The steel drums, and other percussion instruments
are the main attractions. The tempos of what I listen to, and Caribbean music, differ
greatly. The genre of music I listen to can be up to twice as fast as Caribbean music.
Continues for 2 more pages >>




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