Symbolism Of Death Essay

This essay has a total of 860 words and 3 pages.

Symbolism Of Death

In "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson, she speaks much about tradition in a small town in
which many have been lost over the years. The black box, which Shirley speaks about in the
beginning of the story, is of great importance. The black box represents the entrapment of
tradition and the change over time. It is the trapping of tradition because now that it is
worn and ragged they still do not want to change it because it is tradition. Along with
the box changing many people's views on The Lottery, it also lets the town's people stand
strong by themselves. Shirley Jackson in "The Lottery" uses symbolism and irony to
foreshadow death.

Although the towns' people are gathering for a lottery drawing there is an air of
nervousness about the event. From start to finish there is an overwhelming sense that
something terrible is about to happen due to the authors deep use of foreshadowing. The
setting and irony of the story starts when the day is described as a bright sunny day and
all the towns' people are looking forward for the Lottery on the big day, but not knowing
the big day ends in death. Mrs. Hutchinson, as is seen later, is the only one who rebels
against male domination, although only unconsciously. "She tapped Mrs. Delacroix on the
arm as a farewell and began to make her way through the crowd" (318). The word "farewell"
is used as foreshadowing to the climax of the story (318). Normally when a person enters a
crowd of people they are greeted, but not Mrs. Hutchinson for she is obviously "leaving."
Although they are gathering for a lottery drawing there is an air of nervousness about the
event. Shirley Jackson uses an abundance of foreshadowing, which indicates, to a degree,
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