The Bomb that Saved Millions Essay

This essay has a total of 3153 words and 12 pages.

The Bomb that Saved Millions



The Terror that Saved Millions


The atomic bomb and it's use over the two Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki is
still a source of heated debate even over fifty years later. Many people on both sides
-Japan and The United States- hold the belief that Truman's decision to drop the bomb was
a mistake and that under no circumstances should such drastic measures be taken in war.
What these people do not realize are the far more horrible alternatives than the
destruction of just two cities: an invasion of mainland Japan where millions of more
deaths would have occurred, Soviet aid resulting in the division of Japan into a communist
nation and the destruction of their culture, the deaths of thousands of Allied prisoners
of war held in Japan, and the threat of renewed hostilities from Japan not to mention the
possibility of several more years of bloody conflict. Throughout the course of this paper
all of these examples will be discussed, as well as why Truman's decision was the most
humane and rational for all the nations involved, including Japan.


Axis power in Europe was destroyed, Hitler and Mussolini were dead, their armies
annihilated, their nation's in ruins, Japan however was not. Though weakened from a near
four year long war with the Allies, the Japanese continued fighting, as was their code, to
fight to the death, and never surrender. President Harry Truman in the interest of
saving both American and Japanese lives from an invasion of mainland Japan, authorized the
use atomic bombs against Japan.


The first atomic bomb to be used on Japan was composed of uranium. It was dropped on
Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945. The explosion, which had the force of more than 15,000
tons of TNT, instantly and completely devastated 10 square kilometers of the heart of this
city of 343,000 inhabitants. Of this number, 66,000 were killed immediately and 69,000
were injured, more than 67 percent of the city's structures were destroyed or damaged. The
next atomic bomb to be exploded was of the plutonium type, it was dropped on Nagasaki
three days later, producing a blast equal to 21,000 tons of TNT. The terrain and smaller
size of Nagasaki reduced destruction of life and property, but nevertheless 39,000 people
were killed and 25,000 injured, while 40 percent of the city's structures were destroyed
or seriously damaged.


Preceding the bombing of Hiroshima the Americans had pledged that if the Japanese did not
agree to an unconditional surrender and an immediate conclusion to all hostilities that
they would bomb Japan with atomic weapons. The Japanese called the Americans on a bluff or
simply dismissed the American's words as "tough talk" and nothing more, unfortunately for
the Japanese, the Americans did have the weapons they claimed they did, and weren't afraid
to use them. Hiroshima was destroyed, though a catastrophe for the Japanese, it still did
not mean their surrender. The Japanese, urged by their military establishment to continue
the pursuit of victory still did not respond to the American threat. It took the Japanese
another lost city in Nagasaki three days later to commence peace negotiations. It was too
late for over 100,000 people by the time the treaty was signed aboard the American
Battleship U.S. Missouri on September.2nd 1945.


Japan had in essence, been defeated months before the bomb was dropped, the problem no
longer existed to defeat Japan, but to secure her surrender- a far more difficult task.
Quite simply, the Japanese did not believe in surrender. Their nation had never lost a
war. In addition, Japan's fighting men held ingrained beliefs that to surrender was to
disgrace one's self and one's nation. So deeply were these thoughts held that even after
both bombs had been detonated and the entry of the Soviet Union into the war, the Japanese
military still opposed surrender bitterly, and would prefer death than dishonorable
capitulation. With a foe with a mind set such as this, only two options could be
considered by the United States government. One being the use of atomic weapons and the
other being the invasion of mainland Japan.


According to Truman's top military advisors, an invasion of mainland Japan would cost and
an estimated 500,000 American lives, not to mention over a million Japanese deaths.
Truman wrote years later, "We estimated that if we should be forced to carry this
[invasion] plan to its conclusion, the major fighting would not end until the latter part
of 1946, at the earliest. I was informed that such operations might be expected to cost
over a million casualties, in American forces alone." Such an operation would also
require the use of European theater American troops departure from Europe to Japan, to an
aid in the assault. With the largest invasion force ever assembled, comprising of
approximately 2,000,000 troops. (Far larger than the Normandy invasion) According to Major
General Masakazu Amanu, the chief of the Operations Section at Japanese Imperial
Headquarters, "We were absolutely sure of victory over an allied offensive. It was the
first and the only battle in which the main strength of the air, land and sea forces were
to be joined. The geographical advantages of the homeland were to be utilized to the
highest degree, the enemy was to be crushed, and we were confident that the battle would
prove to be the turning point in political maneuvering." To repel the invasion, Japan had
almost two million troops under arms, while millions of civilians were being trained to
kill invaders, with guns, explosive charges strapped to their bodies, and even bamboo
spears. Thousands of planes and midget submarines were being produced by the Japanese for
suicide missions. Fleet Admiral Nimitz once wrote in a memo to Admiral King regarding the
possible invasion of Japan that, "We must be prepared to accept heavy casualties whenever
we invade Japan. Our previous successes against ill-fed and poorly supplied units, cut
down by our overpowering naval and air action, should not be used as the sole basis of
estimating the type of resistance we will meet in the Japanese homeland where the enemy
lines of communication will be short and the enemy supplies more adequate." In addition,
to the Japanese strategic advantages, the Americans knew better than to underestimate the
courage, skill, and tenacity of Japan's military. Fighting in defense of their homeland,
they would be truly formidable and show no mercy towards their foes. It would have been
the bloodiest and most bitterly fought battle of any war in history. And even if the
Americans should emerge victorious after an inevitably fierce and bloody campaign which
would prolong the war an estimated year and a half, total casualties and sheer
destructiveness would have far exceeded those of the two atomic bombs.


The Japanese had developed a new fighting code for the invasion they expected from the
Americans. They were instructed to deny aid to injured comrades, restrict retreat by
making it punishable by death and converting all units including medical and logistical
units into fighting units. It also called for injured soldiers and patients to participate
in the battle, without any attention to one's self. Propaganda was sent all over Japan
preaching these rules and calling for every member of society to die for their native
soil. One Senior Military Officer advocated involuntary sacrifices: "Due to the nationwide
food shortage and the imminent invasion of the home islands, it will be necessary to kill
all the infirm old people, the very young, and the sick. We cannot allow Japan to perish
because of them." According to the slogans that spread through Japan, every man, woman
and child was expected to fight to the death. People were told to sing a song entitled
"The Honorable Death of A Hundred Million". It was even proposed that with the invasion,
the invaders may use Japanese civilians as cover, the Japanese fighters were given strict
instructions to kill the enemy, with hostages or not, and plow down their own if it meant
enemy casualties. The Japanese had even began to mass produce manned torpedoes and
submarines, including 6,000 kamikaze planes. Pilots as young as thirteen were being
trained to kill themselves in the name of the emperor. How could the invasion of such a
fanatical Japan, have been successful without the loss of countless lives?


Upon the conclusion of the Second World War, much of the former enemies to the allies were
divided into sections, one section controlled by the Soviets the other by the United
States. Should the Soviets have been involved in the final defeat of Japan -which would
have been necessary if the bombs hadn't been dropped- then the Soviets would have demanded
a Soviet Zone in Japan, just as they did in Germany, Korea and several other Asian
nations. With the Soviets in control of a good portion of Japan, Japanese culture would
have been compromised indefinitely. It would have surely delayed Japan's recovery, with
the Soviets policy of massive reparations, and the possibility of a resurgent Japan may
have arisen. Without the United States extensive aid after the War, future may have
repeated herself as she did with Germany after the first world war. The atomic bombs
allowed the Americans to end the war by themselves, without any Soviet intervention, and
because of that Japanese culture as well as the security of Japan's former foes was
protected.

Continues for 6 more pages >>




  • Manhattan Project
    Manhattan Project Thesis: The research for the first Atomic bomb was done in the United States, by a group of the best scientists; this research was given the name of “The Manhattan Project”. On Monday July 16th, 1945, a countdown for the detonation of the first atomic bomb took place near Los Alamos, New Mexico. This atomic bomb testing would forever change the meaning of war. As the atomic bomb was detonated it sent shock-waves all over the world. There was endless research done on the bomb in
  • The Decision to drop the Atomic Bomb
    The Decision to drop the Atomic Bomb Maria Tidwell World Cultures III Professor Longfellow 26 November 2000 The Decision to Drop the Atomic Bomb On August 6th 1945, the world changed forever. The United States dropped the first Atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima, Japan. The surviving witness Miyoko Watanabe describes her experience: I came out of the front door…an intense yellow, orange and white light overwhelmed me… the light was thousands of times brighter than a magnesium flash gun…I wen
  • Hiroshima2
    Hiroshima2 Hiroshima I read the book “A World Destroyed: Hiroshima and the Origins of the Arms Race” written by Martin J. Sherwin. I thoroughly enjoyed reading on Hiroshima. Throughout many history classes at different schools I have learned a great deal on Hiroshima, but have found many things in this book that have struck my attention. I really overly enjoyed reading this book, I have learned many new things. I learned many things in this book that I will explain. On the morning of August 6, 1
  • Manhattan Project1
    Manhattan Project1 The Manhattan Project On the morning of August 6, 1945, a B-29 bomber named Enola Gay flew over the industrial city of Hiroshima, Japan and dropped the first atomic bomb ever. The city went up in flames caused by the immense power equal to about 20,000 tons of TNT. The project was a success. They were an unprecedented assemblage of civilian, and military scientific brain power—brilliant, intense, and young, the people that helped develop the bomb. Unknowingly they came to an i
  • Atomic Bomb1
    Atomic Bomb1 On August 6, 1945, the world changed forever. On that day the United States of America detonated an atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima. Never before had mankind seen anything like. Here was something that was slightly bigger than an ordinary bomb, yet could cause infinitely more destruction. It could rip through walls and tear down houses like the devils wrecking ball. In Hiroshima it killed 100,000 people, most non-military civilians. Three days later in Nagasaki it killed roug
  • Atomic Bombing
    Atomic Bombing It is my opinion that the use of this barbarous weapon at Hiroshima and Nagasaki was of no material assistance in our war against Japan. The Japanese were almost defeated and ready to surrender…in being the first to use it, we… adopted an ethical standard common to the barbarians of the Dark Ages." ---Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, Chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during World War II In early August 1945 atomic bombs were dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
  • Atomicb
    atomicb The way the world thinks of war changed forever in 1945. On July 16 in Alamogordo, New Mexico, America exploded the world\'s first atomic bomb, sending a huge mushroom-shaped cloud high into the sky. The Manhattan Project, which was used to end World War II, was mostly led by German and German-Jewish scientists, who had escaped from Hitler\'s Germany. In 1939, an American university professor named Albert Einstein wrote a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in which he outlined th
  • Battered Women in Society
    Battered Women in Society In 1991, Governor William Weld modified parole regulations and permitted women to seek commutation if they could present evidence indicating they suffered from battered women\'s syndrome. A short while later, the Governor, citing spousal abuse as his impetus, released seven women convicted of killing their husbands, and the Great and General Court of Massachusetts enacted Mass. Gen. L. ch. 233 § 23E (1993), which permits the introduction of evidence of abuse in criminal
  • Effects of the atomic bomb
    effects of the atomic bomb Effects of the Atomic bomb By Ralph Coppins Tuesday, August 8, 2000 The effects of the atomic bomb were terrible. There’s no doubt in my mind that the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki were a costly mistake. Atomic bombs produce heat millions of degrees high, and visible ultraviolet and inferred rays. Everyone and everything exposed to their blast is affected. No one is left untouched, whether it be emotional or physical; in many cases both. However, many
  • The Bomb That Rocked the World
    The Bomb That Rocked the World The Bomb That Rocked the World On the tiny island of Tinian, the morning silence of August 6, 1945, was broken by the colossal roar of the engines of the B-29 Superfortress, the Enola Gay preparing for takeoff. Colonel Paul W. Tibbets prepared himself and his crew for the most historic flight of their lives. Neither Colonal Tibbets nor the rest of the men on board knew exactly to where they would be flying. What they did know was that the bomb they were about to de
  • Women battered
    women battered In a conversation with my girlfriend about battered women, she said, "I\'d never put up with that" and then asked, "Why would a woman stay in an abusive relationship?" As relationships progress, there are more emotional and financial ties which makes it harder to leave. The average woman will leave her abuser seven or eight times before making the final break. Women may be afraid of strangers, but it is a husband, a lover, a boyfriend, or someone they know who is most likely to ha
  • The World Goes Bang Band BOOM
    The World Goes Bang Band BOOM I believed this was a world In which all men were brothers Across the four seas Why then do the waves and winds Arise now in such turmoil? by Meiji Emperorar recited by Japanese Emperor in 1945 *Emperor Hirohito On August 6, 1945 at 8:15am history was made. The first atomic bomb called "Little Boy" was dropped in Hiroshima, Japan. Again on August 9 a second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan. Hundreds of thousands of people died. With hundreds of thousands more inj
  • Battered Women
    Battered Women Battered Women\'s Syndrome: A Survey of Contemporary Theories Domestic Violence November 16, 1996 In 1991, Governor William Weld modified parole regulations and permitted women to seek commutation if they could present evidence indicating they suffered from battered women\'s syndrome. A short while later, the Governor, citing spousal abuse as his impetus, released seven women convicted of killing their husbands, and the Great and General Court of Massachusetts enacted Mass. Gen. L
  • Battered women Syndrome
    Battered women Syndrome Battered Women\'s Syndrome: A Survey of Contemporary Theories Domestic Violence In 1991, Governor William Weld modified parole regulations and permitted women to seek commutation if they could present evidence indicating they suffered from battered women\'s syndrome. A short while later, the Governor, citing spousal abuse as his impetus, released seven women convicted of killing their husbands, and the Great and General Court of Massachusetts enacted Mass. Gen. L. ch. 233
  • Battered women Syndrome
    Battered women Syndrome Battered Women\'s Syndrome: A Survey of Contemporary Theories Domestic Violence In 1991, Governor William Weld modified parole regulations and permitted women to seek commutation if they could present evidence indicating they suffered from battered women\'s syndrome. A short while later, the Governor, citing spousal abuse as his impetus, released seven women convicted of killing their husbands, and the Great and General Court of Massachusetts enacted Mass. Gen. L. ch. 233
  • Hiroshima and Nagasaki the untold story
    Hiroshima and Nagasaki the untold story Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the untold story On August 6th 1945, the first Atomic Bomb, Little Boy, was dropped on Hiroshima, and three days later on August 9th 1945, the second atomic bomb, Fat Man, was dropped on Nagasaki, Japans industrial capital. The decision to use the Atomic Bomb against Japan was a poor one considering the damage, the devastation, and the amount of people left dead, injured, or suffering the loss of a family member or a friend, a
  • None Provided5
    None Provided5 Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the untold story By: raja samms Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the untold story On August 6th 1945, the first Atomic Bomb, Little Boy, was dropped on Hiroshima, and three days later on August 9th 1945, the second atomic bomb, Fat Man, was dropped on Nagasaki, Japans industrial capital. The decision to use the Atomic Bomb against Japan was a poor one considering the damage, the devastation, and the amount of people left dead, injured, or suffering the loss of
  • The Atomic Bomb Helpful or Harmful
    The Atomic Bomb Helpful or Harmful There used to be a time in America when the name “Atomic Bomb” seemed fictional to some, non existent to others,and seemed only a dream to those in the science world. That time is long gone.The day that changed all ideas and opinions about what war was and what is has evolved to be was August 6,1945. President Truman had decided to drop the Atomic bomb in order to end the war and save as many lives as possible. The United States had dropped the bomb on Hiroshi
  • Why we dropped the Atomic Bomb
    Why we dropped the Atomic Bomb The dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945 was a definite turning point in the Pacific War of World War II. Earlier that year, Germany had been defeated and the world then turned its attention to the Pacific war. Most history books state the argument that the dropping of the atomic bombs on Japan was necessary to stop the war in order to save thousands of lives of American troops that were planning to invade Japan. "Had the bombs
  • Nuke
    Nuke NUKE THE BASTARDS! A SATIRE The decision to drop the atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was perhaps the greatest American achievement since the defeat of the Native Americans and their containment in reservations. Not only did it swiftly end the war but it showed the Russians who held the upper hand. It also paved the way for the Cold War, which increased Americas war machine to the unparalleled level its at today, as well as numerous memorable events such as t
  • After the Atomic Bomb
    After the Atomic Bomb Introduction The development and usage of the first atomic bombs has caused a change in military, political, and public functionality of the world today. The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki revolutionized warfare by killing large masses of civilian population with a single strike. The bombs’ effects from the blast, extreme heat, and radiation left an estimated 140,000 people dead. The bombs created a temporary resolution that lead to another conflict. The Cold War was a
  • Embracing Defeat
    Embracing Defeat John Dowers Embracing Defeat truly conveys the Japanese experience of American occupation from within by focusing on the social, cultural, and philosophical aspects of a country devastated by World War II. His capturing of the Japanese peoples voice let us, as readers, empathize with those who had to start over in a new nation. The initial terms of surrender were laid out in the Potsdam Declaration of July 26, 1945, in which the United States, Great Britain, and China all
  • Hiroshima2
    Hiroshima2 "We have spent 2 billion dollars on the greatest scientific gamble in history - and won." - President Harry Truman Up until August 6th, occasional bombs, which did no great damage had fallen on Hiroshima. Many cities roundabout, one after another were destroyed, but Hiroshima itself remained protected. There were daily observations of planes over the city, but none of them dropped a bomb. The citizens wondered why they alone, had remained undisturbed for such long a time. There were
  • Manhattan project
    manhattan project The Manhattan Project - Manhattan Project The research for the first Atomic bomb was done in the United States, by a group of the best scientists; this research was given the name of The Manhattan Project. On Monday July 16th, 1945, a countdown for the detonation of the first atomic bomb took place near Los Alamos, New Mexico. This atomic bomb testing would forever change the meaning of war. As the atomic bomb was detonated it sent shock-waves all over the world. There was e
  • The Decision of the Century
    The Decision of the Century The Decision of the Century On August 2, 1945, Harry S. Truman made the toughest decision of his life. He knew that if he made the right decision, he would save hundreds of thousands of American lives. In making this decision, he would also be responsible for the deaths of hundreds and thousands of Japanese lives. If he made the wrong decision, the war would drudge on as the death count rose higher and higher as each new battle was fought. Japan would not surrender u
  • World War II1
    World War II1 INTRODUCTION War is one of the most tragic things in our world today. It is even sadder that usually it comes around at least once in our lifetime. In the 20th century alone we have already had two huge wars. These wars were call the World Wars simply because they involved most of the big countries of the world. Many people have died in these wars, especially the second World War. That is my focus for this essay. The leader of Germany at the time of WW2 and the person who most thi
  • Atomic Bomb
    Atomic Bomb The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki marked the end to the world\'s largest armed conflict. Many debates have surfaced over the ethics of such an attack. The bomb itself caused massive amounts of casualties while the unknown effects of radiation caused many more deaths amongst the survivors of the blast. Despite the ghastly effects of such a weapon, it offered the best choice for a quick and easy defeat of Japan. President Truman, who authorized the use of the atomic bomb,
  • Hitotglggm
    hitotglggm The History of the Atomic Bomb The Atomic Bomb "Then a tremendous flash of light cut across the sky . Mr. Tanimoto has a distinct recollection that it traveled from east to west, from the city toward the hills. It seemed like a sheet of sun. John Hersey, from Hiroshima, pp8 On August 6, 1945, the world changed forever. On that day the United States of America detonated an atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima. Never before had mankind seen anything like. Here was something that was
  • The Atomic Bomb
    the Atomic Bomb The dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 1945 was a definite turning point in the Pacific War of World War II. Earlier that year, Germany had been defeated and the world then turned its attention to the Pacific war. Most history books state the argument that the dropping of the atomic bombs on Japan was necessary to stop the war in order to save thousands of lives of American troops that were planning to invade Japan. "Had the bombs not been employ
  • Why did we drop the bomb
    Why did we drop the bomb In early August 1945 atomic bombs were dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These two bombs quickly yielded the surrender of Japan and the end of American involvement in World War II. By 1946 the two bombs caused the death of perhaps as many as 240,000 Japanese citizens(1). The popular, or traditional, view that dominated the 1950s and 60s--put forth by President Harry Truman and Secretary of War Henry Stimson-- was that the dropping of the atomic b
  • Work
    work WORKS CITED Alperovitz, Gar. "A Guide To Gar Alperovitz\'s \'The Decision to use the Atomic Bomb\'." . 30 Aug. 2000. . . *www.doug-long.com/ga1.htm Alperovitz, Gar. The Decision to use the Atomic Bomb & the Architecture of an American Myth. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1995. Bard, Ralph. "Ralph Bard: An Alternative To A-Bombing Japan." . 30 Aug. 2000. . . *www.doug-long.com/ga1.htm*. Barker, Rodney. The Hiroshima Maidens. New York: Viking Penguin Inc., 1985. Ed. Bird, Kai & Lifschultz, Lawre
  • Dropping of the Bombs
    Dropping of the Bombs The Dropping of the Bombs The end of the World War 2 was inevitably close. The United States and its allies ripped through the European countryside and annihilated the German Army. The United States enemy in the Pacific was less likely to surrender anytime soon. Japan still maintained its position of being a hostile enemy, even though the United States issued an ultimatum of an unconditional surrender or the threat of complete destruction. Soon it became evident that the o
  • The Morality of US bombing of Hiroshima
    The Morality of US bombing of Hiroshima THE ATOMIC BOMBING OF HIROSHIMA AND NAGASAKI WAS IT NECESSARY? Christopher Philippi HS-102 May 3, 1999 On August 6 and 9, 1945, the only atomic bombs ever used in warfare were dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The mass destruction and numerous deaths caused by those bombs ultimately put an end to World War II. Was this the only way to end the war, however? Could this killing of innocent Japanese citizens had been avoided and the wa
  • Womens batter syndrome
    Womens batter syndrome Arts Business & Econ. College Admissions English History Miscellaneous Science & Tech. Psychology Shakespeare Social Issues Custom Writing Search For Papers By Keyword @ Paper Store Top Essay Sites Top 50 Top 25 Top 100 Free Newsletter Click on the banners to keep my site free. Click on the banners to keep my site free. Click on the banners to keep my site free. Click on the banners to keep my site free. Click on the banners to keep my site free. Click on the banners to k
  • Nuclear Arms1
    Nuclear Arms1 NUCLEAR ARMS Minh Le Mr. Ludeke Chemistry April 17, 2000 OUTLINE TITLE Introduction: I. The first sub-topic A. First supporting information for the sub-topic 1. Detail of the information 2. Detail of the information B. Second supporting information for the sub-topic 1. Detail of the information 2. Detail of the information II. The second sub-topic A. First supporting information for the sub-topic 1. Detail of the information 2. Detail of the information B. Second supporting inform
  • Battered womens syndrome
    battered womens syndrome Battered Womens Syndrome - A Survey of Contemporary Theories In 1991, Governor William Weld modified parole regulations and permitted women to seek commutation if they could present evidence indicating they suffered from battered women\'s syndrome. A short while later, the Governor, citing spousal abuse as his impetus, released seven women convicted of killing their husbands, and the Great and General Court of Massachusetts enacted Mass. Gen. L. ch. 233 § 23E (1993), wh
  • After The Atomic Bomb
    After The Atomic Bomb After the Atomic Bomb Introduction The development and usage of the first atomic bombs has caused a change in military, political, and public functionality of the world today. The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki revolutionized warfare by killing large masses of civilian population with a single strike. The bombs\' effects from the blast, extreme heat, and radiation left an estimated 140,000 people dead. The bombs created a temporary resolution that lead to another confli
  • The Atomic Bombs of WWII
    The Atomic Bombs of WWII It was during the Second World War that the United States became a world power, thanks in a large part to its monopoly on atomic weapons. The atomic bomb is a weapon with great explosive power that results form the sudden release of energy upon the splitting, or fission of the nuclei. This new destructive force wrecked havoc on two Japanese cities and caused the end of World War II. It also saved thousands of American lives because a ground invasion of Japan was no longe
  • The Cuban Missile Crisis
    The Cuban Missile Crisis Cuban Missile Crisis On August 6, 1945, the world changed forever. The United States had sent a B-29 bomber plane named Enola Gay to fly over the industrial city of Hiroshima, Japan and drop the first atomic bomb ever - Little Boy . The world had never experienced anything like it. One hundred thousand died almost instantly -- most of them were civilians. Three days later, in Nagasaki, another bomb - Fat Man - was dropped. This time roughly forty thousand died. The peopl
  • The Manhattan Project
    The Manhattan Project On the morning of August 6, 1945, a B-29 bomber named Enola Gay flew over the industrial city of Hiroshima, Japan and dropped the first atomic bomb ever. The city went up in flames caused by the immense power equal to about 20,000 tons of TNT. The project was a success. They were an unprecedented assemblage of civilian, and military scientific brain power-brilliant, intense, and young, the people that helped develop the bomb. Unknowingly they came to an isolated mountain se
  • Hiroshima
    Hiroshima The history of destruction dates back as far as mankind has existed. The constant wars, battles, and death have left an imprint that will forever be engrained into our past. When disastrous events occur, our world begins to change in some way. We often read about the great destruction of World War I, but it\'s very difficult to know the true feelings and opinions of what was happening during that time. This is one small example in the history of destruction. World War II followed suit
  • The Atomic Bomb - 20 pages
    The Atomic Bomb - 20 pages On July 16, 1945, the United States of America ushered the world into a new era with the successful detonation of an atomic bomb in New Mexico. That era was the nuclear age. Less than a month later, on August 6, 1945, an atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan; the first use of a nuclear weapon against an enemy nation. Most of us know of these basic events, but many do not know of the complicated decisions and scientific breakthroughs that paved the way towards tha
  • Battered Womens Syndrome
    Battered Womens Syndrome In 1991, Governor William Weld modified parole regulations and permitted women to seek commutation if they could present evidence indicating they suffered from battered women\'s syndrome. A short while later, the Governor, citing spousal abuse as his impetus, released seven women convicted of killing their husbands, and the Great and General Court of Massachusetts enacted Mass. Gen. L. ch. 233  23E (1993), which permits the introduction of evidence of abuse in criminal
  • Atomic Bomb 2
    Atomic Bomb 2 The Manhattan Project The Manhattan Project was and is still one of the most secretive projects ever created in United States history. The purpose of the Manhattan Project was simple: to build; test; and unleash its power if necessary. Robert Oppenheimer and General Leslie Groves were the two men put in charge of this mission. These two men along with the top scientists from around the country were brought together to construct the most deadliest thing known to man. The project ori
  • The Atomic Bomb: Was It Nessesary
    The Atomic Bomb: Was It Nessesary August 6th, 1945, 70,0000 lives were ended in a matter of seconds. The United States had dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima. Today many argue whether or not the U.S. should have taken such a drastic measure. Was it entirely necessary that we drop such a devastating weapon? To answer that first we must look at was going on in the world at the time of the conflict. The U.S. had been fighting a massive war since 1941. Moral was most likely low, and res
  • Japanese Occupation in SEA
    Japanese Occupation in SEA Japanese Occupation in South-east Asia Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction Background Pg. 3 Thesis Pg. 3 Research questions Pg. 3 Rationale Pg. 3 Methodology Pg. 4 Chapter 2: Literature Review Pg. 5 Primary sources Pg. 5 Secondary sources Pg. 6 Chapter 3: Research Methodology Pg. 8 Procedure Pg. 8 Types of sources Pg. 8 Compiling and presenting the data Pg. 8 Chapter 4: Results and findings Pg. 10 Background information Pg. 10 Conflict between Japan and United St
  • Ronald Takakis Hiroshima
    Ronald Takakis Hiroshima Although WW II ended over 50 years ago there is still much discussion as to the events which ended the War in the Pacific. The primary event which historians attribute to this end are the use of atomic bombs on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Although the bombing of these cities did force the Japanese to surrender, many people today ask "Was the use of the atomic bomb necessary to end the war?" and more importantly "Why was the decision to use the bomb made?" Ronal
  • The Manhattan Project
    The Manhattan Project The Manhattan Project Nuclear research all started when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, and the United States entered into World War II. When the United States realized that Germany attempted to build an atomic bomb, Americans began to concentrate on their research about creating an atomic bomb more heavily. President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Manhattan Project, which included a group of top scientists, under General Leslie R. Groves, who worked around the clock t
  • History Atomic Bomb Essay
    History Atomic Bomb Essay In early August 1945 atomic bombs were dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These two bombs quickly yielded the surrender of Japan and the end of American involvement in World War II. By 1946 the two bombs caused the death of perhaps as many as 240,000 Japanese citizens1. The popular, or traditional, view that dominated the 1950s and 60s - put forth by President Harry Truman and Secretary of War Henry Stimson - was that the dropping of the bomb was
  • Domestic violence
    domestic violence Battered Women\'s Syndrome: A Survey of Contemporary TheoriesDomestic Violence November 16, 1996 In 1991, Governor William Weld modified parole regulations and permitted women to seek commutation if they could present evidence indicating they suffered from battered women\'s syndrome. A short while later, the Governor, citing spousal abuse as his impetus, released seven women convicted of killing their husbands, and the Great and General Court of Massachusetts enacted Mass. Gen.