The Chrysanthemums

This essay has a total of 705 words and 3 pages.

The Chrysanthemums

Most women have a sense of freedom and independence from their male counterparts, but they
will not reach out away from their sheltered lives with a male to a new challenge or a new
life. Women whom breakout of the their molds made by their significant other take a chance
with life and try to become the independent woman others dream about at night. On the
Allen's farm, chrysanthemums flourish, but does Elisa Allen flourish with them? With
tender care, the flowers grow heartily and healthily, though the one who tends them is not
so satisfied with her rooting in life. In "Chrysanthemums," John Steinbeck portrays Elisa
Allen as a stereotypical female, yearning to bloom like the flowers she harvests.

An extremely capable women, Elisa Allen, armed with her scissors, clodhopper shoes,
corduroy apron, and a man's hat, seems to be anything but a demure, timid women. However,
her husband, Henry, views her in a stereotypical way, seeing her as a helpless woman who
is disinterested in practical concepts. Though he acknowledges she has "got a gift with
things," he limits her gifts to things that deal with a typical woman's job: gardening. In
addition, Henry jokes, "I wish you'd work in the orchard and raise some apples that big,"
though he does not really except, or desire, her to leave the hobby of her flowers to
perform "real" labor around the farm. Furthermore, after Henry decides to treat her to
dinner, he playfully jokes with her about going to a boxing match, assuming that, being
female, she has no interest in such things. Unbeknownst to him, Elisa really does have an
interest in the sport, primarily because boxing is outside the realm of her conservative,
feminine world of gardening and housework. Indeed, Henry is caught off guard when he
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