The Moonstone Essay

This essay has a total of 1054 words and 4 pages.

The Moonstone




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Since the beginning of time, man has used various methods on which to pass down stories,
beliefs, and myths which explain different aspects of life. From oral tradition, to
pictographs, to clay tablets, and onto paper, all compose the world of literature. Literature
has always been an infinite realm of ideas, morals, and trains of thought. Although the
sphere of literature is encircled with extreme diversity of thought, its core is focused on
one theme: man. All literature carries with itself three main characteristics: it is written by
man, for man, and about man. Oedipus the King, the great Greek tragedy by the
unparalleled philosopher, Sophocles, is no exception to literature's domain. It deals with
one king, Oedipus, and his plight to avenge the death of his predecessor, King Laios. In
his determined search to find the murderer, he establishes a proclamation which would
demand the banishment and even the death of the murderer. In his ironic action, the reader
discovers that this murderer that Oedipus is so determined to discover is none other than
Oedipus himself. In adhesion to the definition of literature, this tragic plot reveals to the
reader three main commentaries about the nature of man: man cannot escape his past,
pride is the sin which leads man to greater evils, and although the life of man is in itself a
positive good, there will always be a shadow of terrible tragedy that falls across it.
All throughout literature, many works have portrayed characters who carry with
them a dark and gloomy past, and try to tear this shameful history of their lives from the
books of their life. Unfortunately, this is impossible due to the fact that the past is a
precursor to the present which, in turn, determines one’s future. It is one’s past that makes
one what he or she is today. For example, if an individual committed ruthless acts such as
theft or murder, was not caught by the law, and later realizes that that particular aspect of
his or her life has caused them great grief and regret, he or she will make the effort to
change and become a new individual. Let us say that individual becomes one who cares
about the welfare of others and takes social action against the injustices of society. This
individual became what he or she is today because of an incident which occurred in his of
her past. This “catching up” of the past need not always be negative and be portrayed as
some type of revenge infringed upon the individual possibly due to a vile incident in the
past, but the past will always effect the future and its toll is inevitable.
As proclaimed by the Catholic church in the middle ages, seven deadly sins exist
which ultimately lead to the loss of salvation by the soul which indulges in such evils. Of
the seven, pride has been the one which serves as the catalyst for the remaining six. Pride
creates in an individual a disposition of excessive self-love and the need to be better than
another. Once a person has excessive pride, he or she must have the satisfaction of
knowing they are better and must prove this "higher status" through material possessions
and/or power. This has led to the next sin, greed. This domino effect will continue on until
the individual recognizes his or her faults and reconciles, or until he or she has immersed
themselves in the totality of evil and suffers the consequences through death or horrible
Continues for 2 more pages >>




  • Roman Colusseum
    Roman Colusseum Architecture of the ancient Roman Empire is considered one of the most impressive of all time. The city of Rome once was home to more than one million residents in the early centuries AD1. The Romans had a fine selection of building monuments in the city of Rome including the forums for civic services, temples of worship, and amphitheaters for recreation and play. The Romans made great use and pioneered great architecture mechanisms including arches, columns, and even mechanical
  • Roman collusiums
    roman collusiums Roman Coliseums By: Tim Kolton Architecture of the ancient Roman Empire is considered one of the most impressive of all time. The city of Rome once was home to more than one million residents in the early centuries AD1. The Romans had a fine selection of building monuments in the city of Rome including the forums for civic services, temples of worship, and amphitheaters for recreation and play. The Romans made great use and pioneered great architecture mechanisms including arche
  • Analysis of the Hounds of Tindalos
    Analysis of the Hounds of Tindalos Textual Analysis The Hounds of Tindalos The Hounds of Tindalos is a short science fiction story containing many and varied elements that have been long associated with the genre of science fiction. This essay will identify these elements, examining their placement within this short text and also the interchange of these elements with the characteristics of other genres, more specifically, horror. Belknap Long, the author, was clearly intent of incorporating the
  • Greek theatre
    greek theatre Greek Theatre There have been many artistic achievements that have had a substantial role in shaping outlooks and tastes for cultures and generations for 1000’s of years. Of all the different kinds of productions the Greeks have established, the tragedy is the most extraordinary of their spiritual contributions. Everything from style, intellect, appearance of stage, costume, and people have all been the main influences of drama and theatre over the past twenty-five hundred years. T
  • Lysistrata of Aristophanes
    Lysistrata of Aristophanes The Lysistrata of Aristophanes Aristophanes was a satirist who produced Lysistrata around 413 BC when the news of Athen’s warships had been destroyed near Sicily. For twenty-one years, while Athens was engaged in war, he relentlessly and wittliy attacked the war, the ideals of the war, the war party and the war spirit. This risked his acceptance and his Athenian citizenship. Lysistrata is probably the oldest comedy which has retained a place in modern theatre. It prima
  • European History 622 Justinian
    European History 622 Justinian 1. Justinians court was much like the Easterns rule; the subjects were spaced from the rulers in space, dress and obedience. The laws were in Latin, even though the common language was Greek. 2. · 622- Heraclius opened a successful attack on the Persians. · 628- At Ctesiphon a peace treat was signed in favor of Heraclius · 632- Muhammads followers conquered and ran the Empire. · 717-718- Leo III beat back Muslim attack on Constantinople. 3. Iconoclastic policy u
  • Kama Sutra
    Kama Sutra PREFACE IN the literature of all countries there will be found a certain number of works treating especially of love. Everywhere the subject is dealt with differently, and from various points of view. In the present publication it is proposed to give a complete translation of what is considered the standard work on love in Sanscrit literature, and which is called the \'Vatsyayana Kama Sutra\', or Aphorisms on Love, by Vatsyayana. While the introduction will deal with the evidence conc
  • A Black Cat
    A Black Cat Edgar Allan Poe\'s "The Black Cat" "The Black Cat," which first appeared in the United States Saturday Post (The Saturday Evening Post) on August 19, 1843, serves as a reminder for all of us. The capacity for violence and horror lies within each of us, no matter how docile and humane our dispositions might appear. - By Martha Womack Martha Womack, better known to Internet users as Precisely Poe, has a BA degree in English from Longwood College in Virginia, and teaches English and The
  • Analysis of the Hounds of Tindalos
    Analysis of the Hounds of Tindalos Analysis of the Hounds of Tindalos Textual Analysis The Hounds of Tindalos The Hounds of Tindalos is a short science fiction story containing many and varied elements that have been long associated with the genre of science fiction. This essay will identify these elements, examining their placement within this short text and also the interchange of these elements with the characteristics of other genres, more specifically, horror. Belknap Long, the author, was
  • Ancient greek theatre
    ancient greek theatre Wars and the effects on ancient Greek theatre Grant Kohler Before the year 479 BCE, most of the innovations from the Greeks were art in its most common form and in the mathematics and sciences. Examples of this are Pythagoras in 525; he developed a throm about right triangles. It wasn’t until aproxiamtely 458 Bce that the first tragedy was created. Drama had existed before this , but in other forms. What we consider drama first began simply as a chorus of singers, usually s
  • Roman colloseums
    roman colloseums Roman Coliseums By: Tim Kolton Architecture of the ancient Roman Empire is considered one of the most impressive of all time. The city of Rome once was home to more than one million residents in the early centuries AD1. The Romans had a fine selection of building monuments in the city of Rome including the forums for civic services, temples of worship, and amphitheaters for recreation and play. The Romans made great use and pioneered great architecture mechanisms including arche
  • Song of the Unsung Antihero
    Song of the Unsung Antihero Abstract: The sober treatment of a lowly, unheroic protagonist in Arthur Miller\'s Death of a Salesman flatters the audience. The more obvious way that it flatters us is by alienating us from the protagonist in his downfall so that we watch his destruction from a secure vantage. Less obviously, the form of the play, typical of modern American tragedy, romanticizes the protagonist through what I call the audience\'s paradox, that tension created when a serious work of
  • Censorship3
    Censorship3 CENSORSHIP Censorship and the ideology supporting it reiterates concepts from ancient times. In early Greek civilization, Socrates was accused of worshipping strange gods and corrupting the minds of the youth. He preferred to sacrifice his life rather than accept the censorship of his teachings. Socrates advocated free discussion, and is the first person in recorded history to formulate a philosophy of intellectual freedom. Ancient Roman society endorsed that only members of the Sena
  • Ancient greek roman and elizabethan theatres
    ancient greek roman and elizabethan theatres Of the many types of entertainment and past times we have today, theatre is still one of the most loved. For this we have to thank the very earliest forms of ancient Greek and Roman theatre. These ancient time plays were staged often in honor of a god and have paved the way for theatre as we know today. A particular aspect that has had a remarkable effect on the way theatre has evolved is the architecture of ancient theatres. The architecture of ancie
  • Mask in society
    Mask in society M A S K I N S O C I E T Y World Drama: Analytical Essay by Ryan Colbran "Masks have served humankind for centuries as artistic instruments, educational tools and have often reflected and magnified human nature while revealing the inner desires and fears of the human heart. However, as we stand in the 90\'s we have little or no need for masks. Theatre has developed and moved swiftly, parents and schools educate children and humankind no longer feels the need to see their true feel
  • Ancient Greek Theater Architecture
    Ancient Greek Theater Architecture Ancient Greek Theater Architecture Many aspects of ancient Greek theaters have long been studied and debated. Much of the information about these theaters is based on speculation due to the fact that so little of them still exist today. This lack of remnants especially applies to the architecture of the early Greek Theaters. However, through archeological finds and years of studying the people, the plays, and the architecture of the time, we are able to make m
  • Antigone and the Aspects of Greek Theatre
    Antigone and the Aspects of Greek Theatre Antigone and the Greek “Goat Songs” When the ancient Greek playwright Thespis first brought forward one member of the chorus to speak alone, the form of Greek drama began to change. It is thought that Greek drama began as choruses engaging in song and dance at celebrations of holidays or special events. One of the most important of those was the spring festival of Dionysus. The celebration included choral presentation and the sacrifice of an animal, mos
  • Elements of writting
    Elements of writting 1. A good book is the offspring of many fathers and the father of many offspring. 2. Writers Goal By art to attain simplicity. 3. A good style is simple and powerful, like a wave breaking on a beach. 4. Simplicity La Bruyère, knowing that many writers make the mistake of expressing simple things in a complex way, gave this advice to writers: if you want to say that it is raining, say: It is raining. Simplicity is the mark of good prose, and its also a virtue in other
  • Athens Greece
    Athens Greece Athens was the intellectual center of Greece. It was one of the first city-states of its time, and is still known as one of the most famous cities in the world. It was named after Athena, the goddess of wisdom and the city\'s patron. In 508 B.C., Athens became one of the first societies in ancient times to invent democracy. Democracy came from the Greek words, demos, meaning people, and kratein, meaning to rule. This form of government was usually held in a meeting place, which th
  • Daily life in fifth century greece
    daily life in fifth century greece Daily Life in Fifth Century Greece The daily existence of ancient civilisations has been a source of fascination for both historians and archaeologists over the centuries. An abundance of information relating to eating and drinking, clothing, childhood, cosmetics and jewellery survives in the ancient official documents, biographies and plays which have remained in tact. The majority of these however, reflect only the luxurious lives of the rich and those with
  • Renniasance Figures
    Renniasance Figures Cosimo de\' Medici, also known as Cosimo the Elder, lived from 13891464. He was the first Medici to rule Florence. He was exiled from Florence in 1433, but he returned in 1434 and doubled his wealth through banking. He ended Florence\'s traditional alliance with Venice and supported the Sforza family in Milan. His historical significance was being a patron to such artists as Brunelleschi, Donatello, and Ghiberti, and as the founder of the Medici Library. ? Lorenzo de\' Medi
  • Ancient Greek Theatre
    Ancient Greek Theatre Ancient Greek Theater Imagine this following scene: You are sitting in a dark, fairly crowded large room. There are hundreds of other people, in hundreds of other seats surrounding you. In front of you, there is a large stage, with people acting out a play. Lights, music, and different sound effects set the mood of the play for you to understand more clearly what is going on. With these certain conventions, viewer can get a real grasp of a story in which several actors are
  • Philo Judaeus Philospher Poet or Preacher
    Philo Judaeus Philospher Poet or Preacher Philo Judaeus is regarded as one of the greatest Jewish-Hellenistic philosophers of his age. In a majority of his writing he quotes bible verses, speaks of a path to the Lord and does so with such image producing words. While reading Philo it is hard to discern his philosophical views, and surgically placed words, from those influenced of his religious background. He brings fourth an interesting combination of philosopher poet or preacher. Philo Judaeus
  • Israel
    Israel ISRAEL A Political, Cultural, and Religious Description of the Current Atmosphere As Exists in Israel Israel, in the 1990\'s, is in a continual state of political, cultural and religious flux. Religion continues to play a central factor in the difficulties which the state has been and continues to experience. This unique country is characterized by an amalgam of cultural and ethnic diversity. This historical and cultural fact ensures that the difficulties the state has been experiencing
  • Antigone1
    Antigone1 Antigone 1. Biography: Sophocles was born near Athens, in the small town of Colonus, around 495 BC. His ninety-year life span coincided with the rise and fall of the Athenian Golden age. The son of Sophillus, a wealthy armor maker, Sophocles was provided with the best traditional aristocratic education available in Athens (Page 3). Very little is known about Sophocles as a youth, although one public record suggests his participation in “The Chorus of Youths,” chosen to celebrate the A
  • Comedy and Tragedy
    Comedy and Tragedy The starting point when discussing comedy and tragedy would be to define the main terms. Comedy is the dramatic genre that focuses on human weakness through humor. Comedy celebrates the regeneration of life through love and reconciliation. Tragedy is the dramatic genre initiated by ancient Greek playwrights such as Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Tragedy focuses on suffering and loss but celebrates the will of the individual to choose his or her own course of action. Bas
  • Greek Theater
    Greek Theater Ancient Greek Theater Architecture Many aspects of ancient Greek theaters have long been studied and debated. Much of the information about these theaters is based on speculation due to the fact that so little of them still exist today. This lack of remnants especially applies to the architecture of the early Greek Theaters. However, through archeological finds and years of studying the people, the plays, and the architecture of the time, we are able to make many conclusions about
  • Medea1
    Medea1 Medea The Greek tragedy Medea is a tale of a woman scorn and the wrath that follows. The story is one of outright deceit, crippling revenge and questionable justice. It is typical of Greek tragedies in its simplicity, but atypical in the way it justifies horrific revenge. Medea is one of Euripides most enduring plays. It and only a handful of others have survived the several thousand years since their conception. Medea is a typical Greek tragedy. The opening monologue sets the stage for
  • Pre Electrical Staged Lighting and Lighting effect
    Pre Electrical Staged Lighting and Lighting effects PRE-ELECTRICAL STAGE LIGHTING AND LIGHTING EFFECTS There is a common notion that stage lighting is the youngest of the stage arts, having suddenly been developed since the advent of electricity. Electricity was the final link in a chain of development stretching far into the past. True, stage lighting has come a long way since the dawn of electricity but its foundations were thoroughly established during the three centuries before Edison. Colo
  • Scenery 60s
    Scenery 60s In the 1960’s, culture and society saw great upheavals and changes, changes that would affect every aspect of life in America. Naturally, theatre came to be affected in due time, as could be seen in the new subject matter found in the plots of new plays. One of the aspects that came to be affected was scenery of the time. Theater is a diverse and complex art. It requires collaboration among many artists, craftspeople, and managers in order to create a performance for audiences. Sinc
  • The Question of a Protagonist in Fefu and Her Frie
    The Question of a Protagonist in Fefu and Her Friends Fefu and her Friends: An Exploration into the Concept of a Single Protagonist The Mirriam-Webster Dictionary traces the origins of the word protagonist to the Greek, an ancient term describing an individual who struggled against anguish, one who competed in games, one who leads. The rest of the definition, one more contemporary, asserted that a protagonist was the principal character in a literary work (as a drama or story) or a leader, prop
  • Theatre Oral History Report
    Theatre Oral History Report Theatre History Oral Report Aristophanes (448?-385 BC), Athenian playwright, considered one of the greatest writers of comedy in literary history. His plays have been produced through the centuries and have remained popular because of their wit, comic invention, and poetic language. Aristophanes is believed to have been born in Athens, Greece, in the deme, or township, of Cydathenaeum. Presumably, he was well educated and may have had property on the island of Aegina
  • Greek Theater 2
    Greek Theater 2 The Greek Theater: The arts of the western world have been largely dominated by the artistic standards established by the Greeks of the classical period (Spreloosel 86). It is from the Greek word theatron, meaning a place for sitting, that we get our word theater. According to James Butler, The Greeks were the first people to erect special structures to bring audiences and theatrical performers together (27). The theaters were normally located near a populated area at the bottom
  • Attempting to Cheat Fate
    Attempting to Cheat Fate Would it ever seem reasonable for a winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature to be associated with a king who murders his father and procreates with his mother? It is possible because of one quotation by the 1921 Nobel Prize Literature winner Anatole France, that he is connected to the notorious king Oedipus from Sophocles\' famous play, ‘Oedipus Rex\'. "It is only human nature to think wisely and act foolishly" (Anatole France) best exemplifies the theme in Sophocles\'
  • The Rise Of Gladiatorial Combat In Rome
    The Rise Of Gladiatorial Combat In Rome The Rise of Gladiatorial Combat in Rome Gladiatorial contests (munera gladitoria), hold a central place in our perception of Roman behavior. They were also a big influence on how Romans themselves ordered their lives. Attending the games was one of the practices that went with being a Roman. The Etruscans who introduced this type of contest in the sixth century BC, are credited with its development but its the Romans who made it famous. A surviving feature
  • Jumping
    jumping Carthage Goes to War with Rome From the middle of the 3rd century to the middle of the 2nd century BC, Carthage was engaged in a series of wars with Rome. These wars, known as the Punic Wars, ended in the complete defeat of Carthage by Rome. The most prominent figure of the Punic war s was General Hannibal of Pheonician Carhtage. During these wars, it is likely that the colonizing expeditions of the Carthaginians were supported by many emigrants from the Phoenician homeland. Hannibal (b.
  • The Use And Abuse Of History
    The Use And Abuse Of History The Use and Abuse of History By Friedrich Nietzsche Forward Incidentally, I despise everything which merely instructs me without increasing or immediately enlivening my activity. These are Goethe\'s words. With them, as with a heartfelt expression of Ceterum censeo [I judge otherwise], our consideration of the worth and the worthlessness of history may begin. For this work is to set down why, in the spirit of Goethe\'s saying, we must seriously despise instruction wi
  • Metadrama In Shakespeare
    Metadrama In Shakespeare ‘Shakespeare\'s plays reflect not life but art.\' Make use of this remark in writing an essay on Shakespeare\'s use of Metadrama. Shakespeare constantly plays with metadrama and the perception of his plays as theatre and not life with the complications inherent that in life we all play roles and perceive life in different ways. The play has recognition of its existence as theatre, which has relevance to a contemporary world that is increasingly aware of precisely how i
  • Oedipus
    Oedipus Oedipus the King Oedipus being shown in an updated version is a very effective and understandable way to present it to audiences. The play that was viewed in class was a good adaptation of the original play. Although modern versions of Oedipus are far different today than the way they were performed during Sophocles\'s time, I think he would be impressed with the way that modern versions of his play are performed. The reason I think that the play works so well in an updated version is th
  • Long Days Journey Into Night
    Long Days Journey Into Night The Fog of Substance Abuse As the fog descends around the Tyrone\'s summer home, another fog falls on the family within. This fog is that of substance abuse, in which each of the four main characters of Eugene O\'Neill\'s play, Long Day\'s Journey into Night face by the end of Act IV. Long Day\'s Journey into Night is a metaphoric representation of the path from normalcy to demise by showing the general effects of substance abuse on human psychology and family dysfun
  • History of theatre
    history of theatre "History exists only when it is "made" by the historian." (Vince, 65). According to R.W. Vince, it is very easy for researchers to get lost between "fact" and "interpretation" when documenting theatre history. Even when scholars uncover identical pieces of information, they may each have their own personal explanations as to why these facts exist. In turn, readers must exercise critical analysis when studying scholar\'s research and not fall into the trap of viewing history fr
  • The Mask Of Apollo - Review
    The Mask Of Apollo - Review The Mask of Apollo revolves around the adventures of Nikeratos, a young actor who travels the countryside of ancient Greece and Sicily while performing in various plays. In one play, Kadmos by Sophokles the Younger, Nikeratos is required to wear an old mask of Apollo as part of his costume. The mask is fifty years old and is rumored to bring good luck. Nikeratos is impressed with the mask and comes to believe that it possesses special powers. He begins to make reveren
  • Themes of Antigone
    Themes of Antigone The Themes of Antigone Antigone is credited as one of the best works of Sophocles, ranked by most modern critics above Oedipus the King. There are many aspects of Antigone that make it the play critics love to decipher and rave about. "Antigone must be received as the canon of ancient tragedy: no tragedy of antiquity that we possess approaches it in pure idealism, or in harmony of artistic development" hails critic Berhardy (Theatre History). He goes on to rave "It is the firs
  • The role of Women in Greece
    The role of Women in Greece Greek women, as depicted as in their history and literature, endure many hardships and struggle to establish a meaningful status in their society. In the Odyssey, Penelope\'s only role in the epic is to support Odysseus and remain loyal to him. She is at home and struggles to keep her family intact while Odysseus is away trying to return to his native land. The cultural role of women is depicted as being supportive of man and nothing more. Yet what women in ancient Gr
  • The Use And Abuse Of History
    The Use And Abuse Of History The Use and Abuse of History By Friedrich Nietzsche Forward Incidentally, I despise everything which merely instructs me without increasing or immediately enlivening my activity. These are Goethe\'s words. With them, as with a heartfelt expression of Ceterum censeo [I judge otherwise], our consideration of the worth and the worthlessness of history may begin. For this work is to set down why, in the spirit of Goethe\'s saying, we must seriously despise instruction wi
  • Ancient Greek Theatre Architec
    Ancient Greek Theatre Architec Ancient Greek Theatre Architecture We all look for our beginnings. Whether we look for them in our personal life or in our professional life, we still look for them. As I was looking around the theatre recently, I was looking at and wondering where the idea of the theatre came from. Rather, who built it and why it is built the way it is. Who made the first one? Where do the roots of the theatre lay? All very good questions that I hope will be answered. In the begin
  • Medea - the conception of drama within theatrical
    Medea - the conception of drama within theatrical production "The Conception of Drama within Theatrical Production" In Euripides\' tragic play, Medea, the playwright creates an undercurrent of chaos in the play upon asserting that, "the world\'s great order [is being] reversed." (Lawall, 651, line 408). The manipulation of the spectators\' emotions, which instills in them a sentiment of drama, is relative to this undertone of disorder, as opposed to being absolute. The central thesis suggests dr
  • Theatre as Philospohy
    Theatre as Philospohy -Theatre as Philosophy- The evolution of theatre is a long and complex story. What once began as a ritual to the ancient gods has since developed into an elaborate examination of mankind. Theatre originated in Ancient Greece as a celebration to the god Dionysius, where amateur actors would dance and sing in order to imitate him. Consequently, as the Greek Empire developed, so did theatre. By the end of the Greek Empire, scripts were being written, theatres were being built,
  • Greek Theatre in 5th Century BCE
    Greek Theatre in 5th Century BCE Greek Theatre in 5th Century BCE The Ancient Greeks, probably one of the most fascinating civilizations to study contributed several discoveries and technological advancements. One can not discuss the Greeks without discussing Greek Theatre though. Greek Theater paved the way for literature and art in later history in many ways. If it wasn\'t for Greek Theatre famous play writers like Shakespeare would have never done what they are so very well known for. When st
  • Roman Pantomime
    Roman Pantomime In assessment of the origins and nature of pantomime in ancient Rome, one will clearly see that the latter two factors are wide and varied. This is due to the collaborative nature of the art as a whole. With a close examination of archaeological, textual and representational evidence one will gain a precise understanding of how the origins, nature and type of audience of the pantomime are interrelated. One will additionally gain inisight into the widespread popularity of pantomim