The Role of Women in 3 Greek Myths Essay

This essay has a total of 810 words and 4 pages.

The Role of Women in 3 Greek Myths




Persephone and Demeter
One day, Persephone was in the field gathering the crops and Hades, the god of the
underworld, was admiring her. He decided that he had to have her as his wife. Hades then
shook the ground and caused it to split open and Persephone fell into the realm of the
underworld. Persephone was then offered a pomegranate from Hades and she accepted.
Little did she know that once she ate the pomegranate she had to stay in the realm of
Hades as the wife of Hades. Demeter, Persephone’s mother, pleaded with Zeus to get
Persephone back. He explained to Demeter that once she ate the pomegranate she had to
stay there. Demeter is the goddess of the weather and vegetation so her rage cause
massive storms, frigid weather, and everything to stop growing, or die A few months
later, Zeus made a bargain with Hades to let Persephone go for 9 months of the year and
she would be back during the other 3 months. Hades agreed and Demeter was so happy, that
the weather turned nice and everything grew back. This is how the seasons came to be.

Persephone is thought to be a beautiful women with long brown hair and is nearly always
found wandering the fields. She truly is an enchantress, but is also a very gullible
women because she was tricked into eating the pomegranate seeds. Persephone is also
helpless because she can not do anything to break free. The storyteller wants us to feel
bad for both Persephone and Demeter because they are both at a loss. Demeter for losing
her daughter and Persephone for being captured. The female characters are portrayed less
powerful than the male characters in this myth.


Atalanta’s Race
There once was a fair maiden who was the daughter of the king named Atalanta. She was
desired by many suitors. Atalanta vowed to stay a virgin and would never get married.
However, her father pressed her to get married. She came up with a plan, since Atalanta
was very athletic, she would have all the suitor race her, and whoever won the race would
be her husband. Her father accepted the plan hoping that there would be someone fast
enough to beat her. If the suitors in the race were lapped by Atalanta or they lost, then
they would be killed. Even on such hard conditions many brave young suitors showed up to
race her. Among the rest of the suitors was a man named Hippomenes who was favored by
Aphrodite, the goddess of love. Aphrodite wished to help Hippomenes and gave him three
golden apples. He used these apples to make Atalanta stop running to see what he had
dropped, with this time he gained the chance to catch up to her. After dropping al the
apples, Hippomenes had won the race, and the two were to be wed. Nevertheless, Hippomenes
forgot to thank Aphrodite and so she told Rhea, the mother of the gods, and Rhea turned
them both into lions.

The storyteller portrays Atalanta as a tomboy. She didn’t like to do women related chores
Continues for 2 more pages >>




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