The US 19001909 Essay

This essay has a total of 2395 words and 10 pages.

The US 19001909



The United States: 1900-1909
The early 1900s was a great time for Americans. The early 1900s brought many reforms,
changes, and inventions to the country. Many people, around the world, began to recognize
the US as a world power. With the nation’s growing economic and naval power, it was
obvious that the US was a major contender for world domination. Throughout the early 1900s
the United States was dramatically changed from a little nation to a nation of great
wealth and prosperity.

The United States entered the Twentieth Century as a world power along with older world
powers of Europe (Angel, vol. 1) such as France, England, and Germany. The United States
achieved this power by stepping up its navy. The navy won national support and began its
expansion to supremacy, by sending the “great-white fleet” around the world on December
16, 1907 (Angel, vol. 1). This was done to show the world the maturity of American
engineering as well as the substance for the “big stick” policy (Dictionary of American
History, vol. V). The United States wanted to show and warn the other countries of the
world that the US was here and they meant business. Mark Twain said:

“We have pacified some thousands of islanders and buried them…burned their villages, and
turned their widows and orphans out-of-doors…subjugated the remaining ten millions by
benevolent assimilation, which if the pious new name of the musket; we have acquired
property in the three hundred concubines and other slaves of our business partner, the
sultan of Sulu, and hoisted our protecting flag over that swag. And so, by the Providences
of God – and the phrase is the governments, not mine – we are a world power.” (Angel, vol.
1)

From 1900 to 1920 there was a staggering increase in iron ore and crude petroleum
production in the United States. For example, in 1900, there were 27,300 tons of iron ore
and 63,621 barrels of petroleum produced in the US. In 1910, there were 57,015 tons of
iron ore and 209,557 barrels of petroleum produced. In 1920, there were 67,604 tons of
iron ore and 442,929 barrels of petroleum produced (Angel, vol. 1).

As the production of iron ore and petroleum grew, so did the population. At the beginning
of the century the United States population was 75,995,000. The cities around the Great
Lakes, Chicago, Cleveland, and Detroit, expanded a lot faster than the average cities
because coal was available locally for fuel in the factories and because there was good
rail and water transportation (Angel, vol. 1) From 1900 to 1920, many cities expanded
greatly in numbers of people. New York went from 3,437 to 5,620. Chicago went from 1,699
to 2,701. Cleveland went from 382 to 797. Detroit went from 285 to 994 (Angel, vol. 1).
Overall, urban population grew a lot faster than rural population. In 1900, the rural
population in the country was approximately 45 million people and the urban population was
only 30 million people. By 1920, rural population was only at 52 million while urban
population had passed that at 53 million (Angel vol. 1).

Even though changes were made, many things did not change until later on in the century. “
By 1900, only a few states had outlawed factory employment of children under ten or twelve
years of age” (Angel, vol. 1). Children were disadvantaged until the second decade. In
1903, Mary “Mother” Jones lead an army of kids from Philidelphia to Long Island to protest
the employment and exploitation of children.

The black communities, despite the Ku Klux Klan, succeed, in a way, because the lynching
numbers went down significantly from 1900 to 1915. In 1900, there were 110 lynching. In
1905, there were only 60 lynching, and in 1910 there were 58. But in 1915 there were only
55 lynching. From 1900 to 1915, the lynching number was cut in half (Angel, vol. 1). The
KKK did all it could, in the south, to prevent the blacks from getting the vote. On April
27, 1903, the United States Supreme Court sustained a clause in the Alabama constitution
that denied African Americans the right to vote (Angel, vol. 1)

1900 was a very exciting year in America. Dr. Walter Reed and Major William Crawford
Gorgas discovered the cause of yellow fever, in Cuba. On January second, the first
electric bus took its maiden run in New York City. On November third, the first auto show
was held in Madison Square Garden, also in New York City. And on November 7, 1900,
McKinley was reelected as president of the United States of America (Angel, vol. 1)

As the year ended, 1901 began. In this year, oil was discovered in Spindletop Texas, gold
was discovered in California and Alaska, and Guglielmo Marconi sent the first radio
signals across the Atlantic Ocean. On February 25, Elbert H. Gary founded United States
Steel Corporation. On March 2, the Platt Amendment was established which placed the United
States as a protectorate over Cuba. This idea was accepted by Cuba in June. Three weeks
later on the twenty seventh of March, The United States regained its control over the
Philippines after a three-year struggle. But on September sixth, the country was
devastated. On September 6, McLeon Czolgosz, an anarchist, shot President McKinley in the
chest and the abdomen at the Temple of Music in Buffalo, New York (Angel, vol.1). The
president struggled to live for eight days until his death on September 14,1901. Vice
President, Mr. Theodore Roosevelt, was nowhere to be found. Finally, he was located on a
hiking trip in the middle of the Adirondack Mountains. At 2:30pm, on September 14,1901,
Teddy Roosevelt took the oath of office to become the 26th President of the United States
of America. He also became the youngest and one of the most popular presidents in American
history. Roosevelt promised to continue McKinley’s path and keep his appointments “for the
peace, the prosperity, and the honor of our beloved country” (Angel, vol.1).

Theodore Roosevelt’s main policy was to “speak softly and carry a big stick” (Angel,
vol.1). Teddy “supported the old guard, which was the conservative political and big
business leaders who had been responsible for helping him achieve political success”
(Angel, vol.1). He thought that there had to be some type of regulation on the trusts and
monopolies. He was not against big business, he just attacked bad business and their
bosses, owners who were out to control the government. It was said that:

“Roosevelt turned his attention to trusts just 3 months after his 1901 speech to Congress.
Trusts were combinations of big businesses that controlled all or most of an industry.
Some trusts were formed to increase efficiency through standardizing products or to gain
other advantages not usually associated with competition. But other trusts had more
sinister aims. By cornering the market for their product or service, they could eliminate
price competition, allowing then to charge higher prices to their customers” (Angel,
vol.1).

In the 1900s the trusts had a tight control over the government. During 1900s, many trusts
had an arrangement whereby stockholders, often begrudgingly, transferred their voting
power to a single group of trustees. Frequently, these trustees used their positions to
line their own pockets (Angel, vol.1).Because of all the unfair business practices,
Tammany Hall which was run by William M. Tweed, Roosevelt asked his congress for the
establishment of a Department of Commerce and Labor to investigate corporate earnings and
protect workers’ rights.

“Since the Civil War, business influences had dominated government to such an extent that
big business practically ran the government” (Angel, vol.1).

In 1902, the first skyscraper was constructed. The Flatiron Building in New York City. It
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