Thoughts of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle

This essay has a total of 349 words and 2 pages.

Thoughts of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle


Three Athenian philosophers flourish in Greece from 470 B. C. until 320 B. C. These
philosophers were famous for their “schools of thought.” The first of these is Socrates
who lived from 469 until 399 B. C. He did not leave any writings behind; therefore, we
know about his ways of thinking from those of whom he taught. His famous method of
instruction called the Socratic method is still used today. In this method, the teacher
allows students to use their own deductive reasoning to see things for themselves through
a series of questions and answers. Unfortunately, many did not agree with Socrates
teachings. He was accused of corrupting the youth in Athens and sentenced to death.


One of Socrates most famous students, Plato, established a second school of thought.
Flourishing around 400 B. C., Plato contradicted his teacher in that he left many
writings, his most famous being The Republic. He believed that a higher world of
unchanging forms and ideas existed. If a person knew these forms, then he knew the truth.
These things, however, could only be achieved by a mind that had been properly trained.
One of his idea forms was his vision of government. He did not trust the democracy. He
felt that the highest rank should belong to the philosophers who were also kings, followed
by the courageous, and ended with the rest of who must have desire. He established the
Academy at which he taught Aristotle.

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