To Kill A Mockingbird

This essay has a total of 617 words and 3 pages.

To Kill A Mockingbird

Miss Harper Lee has chosen Scout as a first person narrator in this story. This narrative
technique has many strengths and some weaknesses. Scout is a bright, sensitive and
intelligent little girl. For all her intelligence, she is still a child and does not
always fully understand the implications of the events she reports. This is sometimes
amusing, as the time she thinks Miss Maudie's loud voice scares Miss Stephanie. Scout does
her best to inform us of the happenings at the Tom Robinson trial. Yet, she is not certain
what rape is, and is neither aware of the prejudice state surrounding her. Ultimately she
represents the innocence within society.


In To Kill A Mockingbird, Scout Finch, a little girl growing up in a small Southern town,
tells the story of her childhood, when she witnessed the trial of a Negro falsely accused
of raping a white woman. The Negro's lawyer is Scout's father, Atticus Finch. He defends
the Negro vigorously, though he expects to lose the case. As well as being the story of
childhood, it is also the story of the struggle for equality of the American Negro.


To Kill A Mockingbird can be read as the story of a child's growth and maturation. Almost
every incident in the novel contributes something to Scout's perception of the world.
Through her experiences she grows more tolerant of others, learning how to " climb into
another person's skin and walk around in it." On her first day of school she finds that
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