Trustee Vs. Delagate

This essay has a total of 1051 words and 5 pages.

Trustee Vs. Delagate

In a democratic government, functions of representation can sometimes become skewed or
misunderstood. I will examine the different institutions of government including the
legislature, the executive, the bureaucracy, and the courts pointing to their differences
in trustee vs. delegate functions of representation.

My understanding of a trustee is that it is someone in a position of power deciding what
is best without a direct mandate. In other words, someone who is carrying out the wishes
of the constituents when feasible, as well as acting motivated by what he or she feels or
thinks is in the best interest of the community as a whole. A delegate function, on the
other hand, is one that mandates representation of the constituency. A delegate serves to
enact the wishes of those people he/she represents in participation in the development of
laws, policies and in leadership.

English philosopher John Locke viewed the power of the legislature as the most basic and
important branch of government. The theory behind the legislature is that it will enact
laws that will allocate values for society. The legislature works to makes laws, educate,
represent, supervise, and make criticisms of the government. Most of the work of the
United States Legislature is done in committee, where the real power of the legislature is
held. Most legislation originates in governmental departments and agencies. In committees,
a majority vote decides and often, compromise must be reached in order for a bill or law
to survive committee action. This frequently requires that a delegate alter his position
in order to achieve a compromise. This compromise may or may not reflect the wishes of the
people he/she represents.

Modern Bureaucracy in the United States serves to administer, gather information, conduct
investigations, regulate, and license. Once set up, a bureaucracy is inherently
conservative. The reason the bureaucracy was initiated may not continue to exist as a need
in the future. The need or reason may change with a change in the times and the culture
needs. A bureaucracy tends to make decisions that protect it and further it's own
existence, possibly apart from the wishes of the populace. It may not consistently reflect
what might be optimal in terms of the needs and wants of the people. Local governments
employ most of the United States civil servants. The 14 cabinet departments in the U.S.
are run day-to-day by career civil servants, which have a great deal of discretionary
authority. The U.S. government corporations use appropriated funds from congress and use
fees generated through their operations. When it comes to fully managing control over
their bureaucracy, no government has been able to do so. Bureaucratic organizations and
government corporations have sometimes been accused of being unaccountable, irresponsible,
and unresponsive to the needs and wishes of the people. Corruption and inefficiency may be
increased when the bureaucracy is decentralized and more politicized. Growth in an
American bureaucracy may be attributed to the way it was set up, funded and given its
duties by our elected officials. As political, representative leadership and cultural
needs change, it might be difficult for a bureaucracy to mirror the new needs and wishes
of the people and fulfill the mission or purpose it was meant to serve.
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