Essay on Watership Down

This essay has a total of 1109 words and 5 pages.


Watership Down





WATERSHIP DOWN
HAZEL-CIVIL RIGHTS LEADER


There are many intriguing and fascinating lessons and thoughts that can be extracted from
Richard Adams’s Watership Down when inspected under a “magnifying
glass.” From those many issues, the one that is the most influential to ourselves
is the issue regarding anti-segregation, portrayed ingeniously by Richard Adams through
Hazel within many different cases in the novel. Out of those many instances, this essay
will discuss two of them, explain how they display the issue of anti-segregation, and
compare them to a famous historical and political figure.

The character in the novel that Richard Adam decides to portray as a “civil rights
leader” is Hazel. Hazel and his companions have already discovered Watership Down
and have just started getting settled when this first incident takes place. These rabbits
live a very unique style of life. To these rabbits, almost every other kind of animal,
weather known to them or not, weather they have ever seen or heard of them or not, are
considered as Elil and always detrimental. Since Elil are almost every species of
animals besides rabbits, these rabbits must be extremely careful when wondering through
the forests because they might be confronted with Elil and be forced into very bad
situations. In a way, these rabbits believed that all other types of animals, no matter
how similar or different,

are always “bad” and these rabbits can have nothing to do with them. The
exact definition of the word prejudice in the dictionary is - strictly defined, a
preformed and unsubstantiated judgment or opinion about an individual or a group, either
favorable or unfavorable in nature. In modern usage, however, the term most often denotes
an unfavorable or hostile attitude toward other people based on their membership in
another social or ethnic group. The distinguishing characteristic of a prejudice is that
it relies on stereotypes (oversimplified generalizations) about the group against which
the prejudice is directed. This is exactly what the rabbits were. It’s a hostile
attitude relying on stereotypes based on their membership in another group, any other
animal besides rabbits, being the other group in our novel. This is the
“barrier” or “belief” that was broken by Hazel. He strongly
believed that if you gave the other animals a chance, they might be able to prove
themselves not to be enemies. Not only that, but at the end, they might even be
beneficial to the rabbits, which is actually the case here, as we will see later on.

Continues for 3 more pages >>




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