A Drive for Justice




A Drive for Justice

“I have a dream, that one day little black boys and black girls will join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sister and brother.” (de Kay 75)…Martin Luther King Jr.

During the past century, the United States of America has wresled with the problem of inequality between black and white people. Two influential people who helped to combat racism and the inequality of man were Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. Martin Luther King Jr and Malcolm X had two differentiated approaches to accomplish the same things for black. Both King and Malcolm X started their own organizations, organized rallies, and both gave speeches, but, their beliefs and theories were extreme opposites. Martin Luther King Jr. believed in the teachings of Mohandas Gandhi and peaceful ways through speeches and rallies. Martin Luther King Jr. was also a man of peace and freedom and was the leader of the Christian Leadership Conference. Although Malcolm X also did rallies and speeches, he adopted and studied the teachings of the black Muslim leader, Elijah Muhammad, which led him to result in violence, trying to get blacks the same equal rights as whites. He went from place to place trying to develop racial pride in his black listeners by recognizing the suffering whites caused by blacks. Even though some people may believe in one what while others may believe in others, Martin Luther King Jr.’s philosophy of peaceful ways and positive reasoning so blacks could get the same rights as everyone was much more effective compared to Malcolm X’s philosophy of aggression.
Many people thought that Malcolm X’s philosophies became more effective than those of Martin Luther King Jr. because he tried to join whites and blacks togther. But, because of his radical and violent ways, King was by far a way better leader. Malcolm X was a man who supported violence in getting equal rights for black citizens. To do this, he assisted the national Muslim leader, Elijah Muhammad by sharing the Black Muslim beliefs throughout the United States. Malcolm X started many Muslim groups and worked hard to develop racial pride in his black listeners by recognizing the suffering whites caused by blacks. With the Black Muslims, Malcolm X practiced a vigorous self-defense against white violence. He also urged blacks to live separately from whites and prevented them from attaining their freedom. He affected his followers so much that when his followers would see white people they would often harass or hurt the white people. Through his travels in the Middle East and Africa, he began to realize and change his views regarding potential brotherhood between black and white Americans and rejected the view that all whites were devils. (Harris 99) He thought that one day his religion could unite people of all races. To do this he formed his own group, The Organization of Afro-American Unity. Many people, both black and whites admired his tireless efforts to build pride in blacks and whoever shared his dreams that someday everyone would be joined in brotherhood. Malcolm X was admired by many people because of his drive to unite the blacks and whites as one, but many people also condemned his as a hypocrite and traitor because of his change in views. Malcolm X was a man not sure in his views, so later in his life he resorted to peace and loving ways. (de Kay 16) On February 21, 1965, while speaking in a rally in Harlem, he was shot and killed.
Coming from a different perspective, Martin Luther King Jr., one of the most powerful African American leaders the world has ever had, dilligently worked to unite the two races as one by peaceful and nonviolent methods. Devoting his life to fight for the right of every black American and also disliked the public, King defeated the odds and led blacks into rallies, marches and many other nonviolent protest to get blacks on the right track for equal rights. (Hakim 102) His non-violent attitude is what tood a stand in history.
Martin Luther King Jr., after studying under the teachings of Mohandes K. Gandhi, learned about campaigns of passive, nonviolent resistance called “passive resistance”. (de Kay 26,27) An example of this was that Gandhi too