Death Penalty8




David Milgard Case

For most crimes committed in Canada a fine, sentence of time in jail or execution is the punishment. However, the death penalty is the most questionable punishment. Is it morally right? Is it effective in deterring crime, primarily murders? Weather or not you agree if it is moral or not, one issue remains. The death penalty is not an effective way to determine crime. I myself think that Death penalty is wrong.

The death penalty has existed as long as humans have existed. In the middle ages fines, public humiliation and imprisonment were appropriate punishments for all crimes, and death penalty for all murders. Today, Federal law states that the death penalty is to be enforced with convicted criminals for: treason; deserting armed
forces during wartime; murder committed by a soldier; kidnapping and
murder that involves crossing state lines; murder committed during an
airplane hijacking; and of course, homicide. The death penalty is also called for punishment of attempting to kill anyone.

Whether if anyone supports or opposes capital punishment (Death Penalty), there is swelling evidence that the system isn’t working. A review of death penalty judgments over a 23-year period found a national error rate of 68 %. In a matter of life and death, the judges are getting it wrong more than 2 out of every 3 times. If someone commits a crime they shouldn’t be sent for death penalty because who knows if they did it or not.

Many people believe that the death penalty isn\'t an effective way to determine crime. I think death penalty is a foolish way to determine crime. I think this because if the judge makes a wrong judgment the poor guy would be dead for no reason. People should be sent to jail for the crime that they convicted instead of death penalty. For example let’s say I killed someone for this crime I should be sent to jail for about 40-60 years by this time I would have realized that what I did was wrong. For my conclusion I disagree with death penalty I think it should be stopped.


Bibliography:
www.warandcrimology.com