Did W Shakespeare Really Exist





Sept. 12, 2000

It is part of every person\'s education to be taught that William Shakespeare is one of the greatest writers of all time. Shakespeare was a man who began life from in modest family, with virtually no education early on, in the16th century town of Stratford-upon-Avon, England, and who later wrote plays and poetry that were to win praise throughout the world. It is an inherited belief that has been passed own from generation to generation.
With the increase in learning of the present day, and a growth of research opportunities, more and more people have become dissatisfied with this inherited teaching. Substantial inconsistencies and illogicalities have been detected within its content. This is the cause for extensive examinations that have contradicted what people had before now believed in without question. As a result, a number of different ideas to be considered about Shakespeare and who he really was.
The authorship debate is about the conflict it has caused. On the one hand, there are those who refuse to abandon the inherited teaching. Instead they devote themselves to explaining, if they can, and excusing, if they cannot, the inconsistencies of Shakespeare’s story. On the other hand, there are those who have abandoned the inherited teachings. They see the ideas of the literary scholars to be unproved; and as more and more information comes to light, their ideas become almost naïve.

Questioning W. Shakespeare’s Existence Using the Stratford Monument’s Clues

Although students of literature are taught to believe that the great poet and playwright, William Shakespeare, was the same man that bought and sold property and dealt in farm produce within his native Stratford-upon-Avon, it is a belief that rests solely upon four key pieces of information. They are Greene\'s Groats-worth of Wit; Sweet Swan of Avon, the tributes inserted at the front of the First Folio of Shakespeare\'s collected plays, and the Stratford Monument. Even they can be questioned. The Stratford Monument is actually a great factor in proving the Oxfordian viewpoints.
In 1623, a monument was erected in Shakespeare’s honour inside the Holy Trinity Church at Stratford-upon-Avon. After almost four centuries, the monument’s true purpose has been revealed. Two secrets encrypted into the text with mathematical precision, each spell the name of the nobleman who was associated with the authorship of the Shakespearean plays. This man is Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford.
As a consequence of this, the doubts that previously existed concerning true authorship have almost all been settled. The secrets of the monument urge that the person it has revealed should be tested. The truthfulness of the monument\'s message can therefore be confirmed, or denied, by comparing and examining the credentials of both men; the one named by the monument, and the other, conventionally affirmed by Stratford enthusiasts to be the real Shakespeare.


The Epitaph to William Shakespeare, erected in 1623 inside the church of the Holy Trinity at Stratford-upon-Avon:

IUDICIO PYLIUM GENIO SOCRATEM, ARTE MARONEM,
TERRA TEGIT, POPVLVS MAERET, OLYMPVS HABET

STAY PASSENGER, WHY GOEST THOV BY SO FAST,
READ IF THOV CANST, WHOM ENVIOVS DEATH HATH
PLAST,
WITH IN THIS MONVMENT SHAKSPEARE: WITH
WHOME,
QVICK NATVRE DIDE: WHOSE NAME, DOTH DECK Ys
TOMBE,
FAR MORE, THEN COST: SIEH ALL, Yt HE HATH
WRITT,
LEAVES LIVING ART, BVT PAGE, TO SERVE HIS WITT.

OBIIT ANO DO 1616
ÆTATIS 53 DIE 23 AP

Notice the first lines to the three opening couplets. They are both an order and a challenge to everyone that reads them. They pretty much mean “Stop! Do not hurry by. If you can, read who has been placed in this Shakespeare Monument. Since the Monument is too small to contain a body, it must be just the name of a person that has been enclosed,” and of them we are asked to read.
The first clue to that identity begins with the switching of a noun and its adjective. This is common in Latin, but not in English, for it changes ‘This Shakespeare Monument’ to ‘This Monument Shakespeare.’ This could be thought to mean the monument of someone named Shakespeare, as opposed to the monument for Shakespeare.
The second clue is derived directly from what follows: ‘With Whome,’ for it is ‘Quick Nature’ that follows, and this can be read in