FEMALE GANGBANGERS



A year in the World of Female Gangsters:
There is no way you can neatly squeeze in a single report what female gang life posses. What I am giving is highlights and statistics staffed with local information. There is no such thing as a typical gang each possess a history that reflects the community they grew up in. The research is in Los Angeles and smaller California communities San Antonio, Texas, and Chicago, Ill.. Most research has been done in L.A. where female gangs have achieved a greater notoriety more than anywhere else but no matter where the gang is each are similar in nature.

History of gangs:
The history of gangs is a history of fear—the fear of the outsiders. Although their skin was darker, their faith was catholic, Latino gangs grew in Los Angeles for reasons that most street gangs do everywhere, including the white Italian and Irish gangs of Chicago and New York in the mid 1800’s and later the German and Jewish gangs as a result of swift demographic change. In the 1920’s thousand of Hispanics streamed into California to answer the need for cheap labor, looking for a “better life”. It was here the term Barrio, a Hispanic settlement in unincorporated terrain’s left over from the Italians and Irish Youths who moved into the larger economy and society of Los Angeles.
When the Depression hit in the 1930’s, the Hispanics were no longer needed.
It was felt that they took away the jobs from the poor white families. These were jobs white people would not of even considered working in but was all that was available in times when jobs were scarce.
The Hispanic Communities remained outcasts, facing more intense discrimination than most white immigrants do. California began repatriation, forcing immigrants back across the border.
Throughout the 1930s and 1940s neighborhood street gangs formed for protection and identity. Their members were called cholos, “people trapped between worlds”, originally referring to those on the fringes of indigenous Indian and Spanish colonial cultures in Mexico. In America it meant poor second-generation kids whose parents remained Mexican at heart while their children desired, yet were denied, full American citizenship. Misunderstood in their own homes as unwelcomed outsiders they fell into the area between Slauson Avenue and Firestone (Manchester), during the 20\'s and 30\'s which was occupied primarily by white residents, but just south of Firestone, African-American populations were growing in Watts between 92nd Street and Imperial.
During the 1920\'s and 30\'s, some of the Black gangs that were active in Los
Angeles were the "Goodlows," "Kelleys," "Magnificents," "Driver Brothers," the "Boozies," and the "Blodgettes" which hung out in an area off the Imperial Freeway known as the "Blodgette Track," where the 105 Freeway is today.
The "Boozies" were a family of many brothers and friends who were involved in
prostituion and robbery.

The guys frequented the Jefferson Park area on Los Angeles and hung out on Denker Avenue. The "Magnificents" were a group of youths from the Central Avenue on the eastside of LA. Eventually these gangs faded in the late 1930\'s as the youths became older. Gangs during this time were strictly juvenile in nature, and those reaching their late teens distanced themselves from gang.
Although black gangs also existed by the 40’s, they were in response to racist whites. Today one of the largest gangs in L.A. “Grape Street Watts Crips”, named after it’s neighborhood turf of 103rd and Grape Street is the oldest black gang in existance.
The Crips and Bloods didn’t arrive on the scene until three decades later, the Crips being the largest of the two out numbering Bloods seven to one, but not to undermine their reputation it is thought the Bloods are more crazier.
According to statistics in 1993 female gangs represented 10% of 650,000 gang members, this polled from 79-law enforcement agencies nation wide. This does not identify those girls that are affiliated with already existing male gangs. These girls are regulated to associate gang members.

Female Gangs
Wherever teenage boys get together, girls are sure to follow. The early female gangs were called Cholas. They wore short skirts, mesh stockings, and pompadours. In the 1960s, they grew their hair long and teased, lined their eyes in black and white raccoonlike circles, and slithered into hip-hugging