Immigration is an issue of great controversy





Immigration is an issue of great controversy

In the19th century, the fundamental of philosophy and policy was free trade. Freedom of movement was generally seen as an essential part of it. It was the best way to insure individuals that labor would be spread evenly among various geographical areas so that it was most useful for private and social prosperity. However, today the philosophy is the same but it is not any more followed by the policy that is the policy of trade and migration restrictions. Through the time as immigration rates raised every year, the life became harder for some Americans and strong opposition of free trade appeared with upcoming problems caused by immigrants, these problems are the main arguments in hands of opposition saying that the uncontrolled immigration harms the United States and individual citizens. Therefore, the US government is trying to stop immigration flow even if breaking their natural rights. These rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness are clearly stated in the Declaration of Independence that is the fundamental of all laws that has to be protected by the government. Government was thrown into situation where does not yet exist solution that would satisfy both sides and both sides have their own part of the truth. On one side is the opposition of free immigration. Opponents of immigration see three main problems as the most important arguments against opening borders to immigrants. Immigration opponents argue that immigrants take jobs from Americans and lower wages, consume more in government services than they pay in taxes, harm everyone else through environmental degradation and urban overcrowding, on the other side are immigrants saying that in spite of some problems, there are advantages of free immigration and that their rights are stated in The Declaration.
One of the main arguments of opposition is that immigrants take jobs from Americans and lower wages. This happens because of supply-and-demand economy, the more of something there is, the less value it has therefore the unnatural import of alien workers degrades the value of low skilled natives and earlier immigrants (“Immigration Lowers Wages” , 1998). Consequently, Americans that have higher wage expectations are often displaced by immigrants and if not their wages are lowered to meet the wages of immigrants. This is caused not only by immigrants but also by high-immigration cheerleaders that claim that U.S. economy needs the immigration. Nevertheless, more truthful would be that business people are not interested in hiring Americans because the people who come from outside are cheaper. However, they ignore the detrimental effect that importing workers has on American workers, particularly low-skilled natives, and earlier immigrants. By artificially inflating the number of workers in our country, immigration lowers the value of workers, and wages are depressed. The low-skilled immigration workers could be responsible for about 50 percent of wage-loss, as Government research suggests, and the effect is visible especially in high immigration cities (“Immigration Lowers Wages” , 1998). These cities have about 48 percent lower wage increase as low-immigration cities therefore many poor natives are moving from high-immigration areas to other cities searching for higher earnings. The immigration of foreigners to American cities is therefore triggering a second internal migration, away from high-immigration cities by poor natives who in many cases have trouble competing with them for jobs. Therefore, the antipathy against immigrants grows in cities with high immigration where natives are earning less (“Immigration Lowers Wages” , 1998).
Other key problem of immigration is that opponents argue that the costs of the immigrants to American society are enormous. In the year 1996, the overall immigration costs reached $65 billion and the costs continue to rise steeply, the most recent estimates place the costs of post-1969 immigrants at $65 billion in 1996 alone $40.5 billion from legal immigrants and $24.5 billion from illegal immigrants (‘The Costs of Immigration“, 1996). By the governmental studies in ten years by the year 2006, the annual net costs of immigration would rise to $108 billion that would by 66 percent higher than the costs in 1996. The net national cumulative costs for the decade 1997-2006 for all post-1969 immigrants will be $866 billion, an average