pop art




Pop Art, visual arts movement of the 1950s and 1960s, principally in the United States and Britain. The images of pop art (shortened from "popular art") were taken from mass culture. Some artists duplicated beer bottles, soup, cans, comic strips, road signs and similar objects in paintings, collages, and sculptures. Others incorporated the objects themselves into their paintings or sculptures, sometimes in startlingly modified from. Materials of modern technology, such as plastic, urethane foam and acrylic paint. One of the most important artistic movements of the twentieth century, pop art not only influenced the work of subsequent artists but also had an impact on commercial, graphic, and fashion design.
The pop art movement began as a reaction against the abstract expressionist style of the 1940s and 1950s, which the pop artists considered overly intellectual, subjective, and divorced from reality. To close the gap between life and art, pop artists embraced the environment of everyday life. In using imaged that reflected the materialism and vulgarity of modern mass culture. Their work allowed the view to respond directly to the object, rather than to the skill and personality of the artist. A few pop art artist’s were David Hockney, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, and George Segal.




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