Sand





Sand

Sand can tell a lot about a land. Amelia island sand most likely does the same. But before one can find out if the sand depicts the island, one most know what sand is. The pure definition of sand is grains worn from rock between 0.06 to 2.0 millimeters in diameter. Sand can be talked about as sediment when it is together with silt, gravel, and clay. (3) But on top of that basic definition, one should know what makes up sand, the ways sand is distributed, and about Amelia Island itself.
As told earlier, sand is formed from worn rock. Those rocks are the sedimentary, metamorphic, or igneous rocks. A sedimentary rock is made up of chemical, mechanical, or organic sediment. Some important types of Sedimentary rock which are distinguished by texture and chemical composition are sandstone, conglomerate, tillite, shale, sedimentary breccia, chalk, marl, coal, lignite, rock salt, gypsum. Igneous rock is rock that is formed by the solidification of a molten magma. If the rock is made from lava on the earth’s surface, it is called extrusive rock, but if the igneous rock solidified beneath the earth’s surface it is called intrusive rock. Metamorphic rocks start from the changing in the texture and mineral whole of sedimentary, igneous, and older metamorphic rocks under excessive pressure and heat within the earth. Some of the most common metamorphic rocks are gneiss, quartzite, schist, slate, and marble. (2)
There are tons of examples of how a type of sand tells of the land it is from because of the rocks it is made up of. A great example of that is if you find sand made from plutonic igneous rocks, then one know that the sand is probably near mountains, since plutonic igneous rocks form the bulk of mountain ranges. (6) Sand made of volcanic rocks, which is probably extrusive rock (2), are most likely near volcanoes because those rocks are formed from lava. (6) The rocks sand is made up of is essential to figuring out where the sand is from, and in the making of sand itself.
In some places there are no useable sources of sedimentary material, then the sand usually is made of organic material. Those are materials like coral, fragmented shell, and the skeletons of small planktonic organisms. The sands that are completely made up of those materials each have a name. One type is coral sand, which is made up of corals. Shell sands, which are made up of shells, is another. Foraminiferal sands, which are made up mainly of an order of Rhizopoda (Rhizopoda is a subclass of Sarcodina) which is mostly made up of marine protozoan that contain one or more nuclei, is yet another. The organic material in sand, or the lack of it, is extremely important because it can help tell whether the sand is from a beach or tropical place, or from a desert, or other places like that. (6)
Sand can also show where it is from because of the minerals it contains. The most common mineral is silica, which is often in the form of quartz. Other minerals that are in sand are usually in small portions. Some of those minerals are olivine, the micas, the feldspars, garnet, calcite, hornblende, magnetite. Each of those minerals has their own distinct appearances. Quartz is usually rounded, and looks clear and glassy, but it can be milky. Olivine has a glassy shine and is olive green, mean while mica has luster, can break into thin sheets, and is soft. Feldspar can be a variety of colors, either gray, tan, or pink with a dull luster or shine. Garnet can be pink or red, and has a glassy shine. The calcite has a pearly type luster and breaks into tiny, cube like pieces. Hornblende can either be black or dark green. The mineral magnetite is attracted to magnet and is dark colored. The minerals the sand contains can help distinguish the home of that particular sand and from what type of rock it is originated. (5)
A person can tell a lot about the land that particular sand is from by examining the sand and finding out what minerals it has. Examples of that are that sediment that possibly had feldspar minerals and largely composed of quartz and