Using NetIQ s AppManager




Enterprise Network Management
J. Banks, J. Brown, E. Kimble, J. Sachsel
1
Organizational Impact of an
Enterprise Network Management Solution
Using NetIQ’ s AppManager
University of Maryland, University College
Adelphi, MD
Team J3E Members
Jeffrey Banks
Jeremiah (Pep) Brown
Evelyn Kimble
Jeffrey Sachsel
July 14, 2000

Enterprise Network Management
J. Banks, J. Brown, E. Kimble, J. Sachsel
2
Table of Contents
Abstract .......................................................................... 3
Introduction to
Enterprise
Network
Management.......................................................................... 4
NetIQ
Biography .......................................................................... 6
AppManager
Software .......................................................................... 8
Business
Cases.......................................................................... 13
Relationship
To Service
Profit Chain .......................................................................... 19
Conclusions .......................................................................... 22
References .......................................................................... 23
List of Figures
NetIQ’ s
AppManager
Mulit-Tier
Architecture .......................................................................... 10
Heskett
Service
Profit Chain .......................................................................... 20

Enterprise Network Management
J. Banks, J. Brown, E. Kimble, J. Sachsel
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Abstract
As 21 st century organizations depend more heavily on their information
technology departments for critical business functions, management of IT resources
becomes a serious strategic concern. New solutions for monitoring, allocating and
troubleshooting IT resources are developed with enterprise-wide information systems in
mind. One of these tools is NetIQ’ s AppManager. The intent of the research is not to
tout the benefits of any particular software package, but rather to describe the
functionality of an all-encompassing solution to enterprise network management, and
analyze the benefits similar software tools can provide to an organization. The following
report will provide evidence that implementation of an enterprise network management
solution is essential to improving critical business processes of organizations that
depend on efficient operation of their computer systems.


Enterprise Network Management
J. Banks, J. Brown, E. Kimble, J. Sachsel
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Introduction to Enterprise Network Management
The role of an IT department is to ensure availability and performance of
business-critical systems and server applications. Throughout IT departments
distributed systems management is considered an essential ingredient for the
successful deployment and maintenance of these systems. The ability of IT personnel
to manage an entire enterprise-wide networked environment from one remote location
greatly increases their strategic value and productivity. Solutions such as AppManager
provide automation of repetitive network management tasks, monitoring of system
resources, automated fault detection and alerting and pro-active error correction
functionality. Another advantage provided by AppManager is the ability to store and
analyze data describing the state of the networked environment. These services
provide IT personnel with the information and control necessary to ensure transparent
management of an organization’ s networked resources.
According to Stallings and VanSlyke (1998) the International Organization for
Standardization (ISO) suggests 5 categories that are essential to proper network
management. These categories are configuration management, fault management,
accounting management, performance management and security management. Each
of the 5 management categories have unique characteristics that cover a wide range of
business processes related to the use and availability of an organization’ s networked
assets. They are also interrelated in a way that a change in one area of management
can have an effect on any or all of the other categories.
Configuration management facilitates the continuous operation and
interconnection of networked assets. Control of the relationships between system Enterprise Network Management
J. Banks, J. Brown, E. Kimble, J. Sachsel
5
components is addressed at this level (Stallings and VanSlyke, 1998). The ability to
redefine default component attributes to enable improved information processing is
critical to the efficiency of the enterprise. Configuration management is closely related
to fault management since it is often necessary to reconfigure sections of a networked
environment to bypass component weaknesses or errors.
Fault management is the ability to detect, isolate and correct abnormal network
operations. Upon detection of a fault or component failure it is necessary for several
events to occur. The network must be isolated from the fault to allow continuation of
service without interference. The network must then be reconfigured or modified to
minimize the impact of the fault. Finally, the failed component must be repaired or
replaced in order to restore the network to its initial state (Stallings and VanSlyke,
1998).
Accounting management is the establishment, monitoring and distribution of
charges for use of networked resources. This is strictly an internal management
function of developing charge-back algorithms, identifying inefficient or abusive
resource usage and updating business plans that address resource allocation or
network expansion (Stallings and VanSlyke, 1998).
Performance management is concerned with monitoring the behavior of and
communications between networked components. By comparing network performance
statistics to an established baseline, situations can be identified as areas of present or
impending performance degradation. It is imperative to identify and correct potential
performance bottlenecks before they cause problems for either internal or external
customers (Stallings and VanSlyke, 1998).

Enterprise Network Management
J. Banks, J. Brown, E. Kimble, J. Sachsel
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Security management involves the protection of sensitive data and equipment
from unauthorized users. Businesses with a presence on the Internet are particularly
concerned with unauthorized access to data and network components (Stallings and
VanSlyke, 1998). Access control, data encryption and user authentication are the three
areas of concern when providing protection for network resources and