Mathematics Page 15

Descartes Meditatins Descartes\' Meditations Descartes overall objective in the Meditations is to question knowledge. To explore such metaphysical issues as the existence of God and the separation of mind and body, it was important for him to distinguish what we can know as truth. He believed that reason as opposed to experience was the source for discovering what is of absolute certainty. In my explication, I will examine meditation two in order to discover why knowledge was so important to De
Descartes Meditations The way Descartes chose to write this piece literature captivated me. Descartes was a very intelligent man who wanted to make sense of the world he lived in. The format he used was unusual. It seems to me that he may have used this format, which is a replication of the book of Genesis in the Bible, to have a deeper and more profound impact on the reader. There are many similarities between Descartes Meditations and the first book of the Bible, Genesis. For example, Descar
Descartes Meditations The way Descartes chose to write this piece literature captivated me. Descartes was a very intelligent man who wanted to make sense of the world he lived in. The format he used was unusual. It seems to me that he may have used this format, which is a replication of the book of Genesis in the Bible, to have a deeper and more profound impact on the reader. There are many similarities between Descartes Meditations and the first book of the Bible, Genesis. For example, Descar
descartes proof og god Descartes\' Proof for the Existence of God Many readers follow Descartes with fascination and pleasure as he descends into the pit of skepticism in the first two Meditations, defeats the skeptics by finding the a version of the cogito, his nature, and that of bodies, only to find them selves baffled and repulsed when they come to his proof for the existence of God in Meditation III. In large measure this change of attitude results from a number of factors. One is that the
Descartes vs Hume Rationalism and Empiricism are most likely the two most famous and intriguing schools of philosophy. The two schools deal specifically with epistemology, or, the origin of knowledge. Although not completely opposite, they are often considered so, and are seen as the Jordan vs. Bird of the philosophy world. The origins of rationalism and empiricism can be traced back to the 17th century, when many important advancements were made in scientific fields such as astronomy and mec
Descartes Descartes\' Distinguished Distinctions Descartes overall objective in the Meditations is to question knowledge. To explore such issues as the existence of God and the separation of mind and body, it was important for him to distinguish what we can know as truth. He believed that reason as opposed to experience was the source for discovering what is of absolute certainty. Here Descartes discerns between mere opinion and strict absolute certainty. To make this consideration he establish
Descates Is our education complete once a degree has been earned? Have we learned all there is to know? Can we be sure of what we have come to know? Only a completely self-assured person might answer yes to these questions, but for Rene Descartes (1596-1650) the completion of his formal education left him feeling and thinking he was still ignorant about the certainties of human experience and existence. This prominent Renaissance philosopher conquered the world of uncertainty in a work written
Dewey and Hume As stated in the school handbook, The purpose of Michigan University is to make its students more valuable human beings and more useful members of society. Michigan seeks to help its students realize their fullest intellectual and personal potential combined with a deep sense of ethical and social concern. When my parents read this passage for the first time three years ago, my father\'s comment was that for $120,000 they better make you realize something there. When I read t
Do we have to learn to think scientifically in order to find the truth Humanity has been searching for the truth since the beginning of time. This search has produced many things like science, which has greatly advanced the cause that created it. There are many inherent problems in science, and it is not necessary to think scientifically in order to find the truth. There are many types of truth, but the most fascinating one is absolute truth. The basics elements of science, however, make it alm
Doudt In his first meditation, Descartes sets out with amazing clarity and persistence to clear himself of every false idea that he has acquired previous to this, and determine what he truly knows. To rid him of these rotten apples he has developed a method of doubt with a goal to construct a set of beliefs on foundations which are indubitable. On these foundations, Descartes applies three levels of skepticism, which in turn, generate three levels at which our thoughts may be deceived by erro
dualism notes While the great philosophical distinction between mind and body in western thought can be traced to the Greeks, it is to the seminal work of René Descartes (1596-1650) [see figure 1], French mathematician, philosopher, and physiologist, that we owe the first systematic account of the mind/body relationship. Descartes was born in Touraine, in the small town of La Haye and educated from the age of eight at the Jesuit college of La Flèche. At La Flèche, Descartes formed the habit of
Faith and Reason Faith and Reason Faith and reason can be viewed as opposites. Faith is an element of belief, something an individual does not necessarily require a reason for accepting without reason. For example, an individual’s reason for believing in God may not seem too rational when they are trying to explain them. They may not even stand up to criticism. On the other hand, reason is constructed as a formula. Faith is basically something we believe in, like something we learn in church. R
hot lez sex What is Truth and the best way to obtain it according to Ancient Scientists? In general, truth is anything that is correct of nature. The truth is in existence yet is not understood/known until it is uncovered. (Bruce Foltz WHGC lecture What is truth?) This truth is uncovered for science only through mathematics. Math (numbers, equations, etc.) is the explanation for how and why everything in nature occurs the ways it does, according to science. In addition to math, yet more contr
Human Understanding In the history of human understanding, I couldnt think of any person to study for a singular perspective of gaining knowledge through philosophy. I am glad that the class has been given two philosophers to compare and contrast their ideas. The subject of human understanding is a wide range of ideas to discuss, which can be quite complex, a feat I would never return to do. The two philosophers Rene Descartes and David Hume take the task of discussing human understanding and
Justified True Belief Justified true belief was Platos attempt to bring rigour to his claim to know something. Briefly explain what he meant by justified true belief and, more importantly, attempt to relate it to your own ways-of-knowing and your personal conviction of what it is to know something. Plato founded an academy almost two and a half thousand years ago that was concerned with validating its knowledge in the areas of science, mathematics and philosophy. On what grounds can we be
kant1 How does one label Kant as a philosopher? Is he a rationalist or an empiricist? Kant makes a distinction between appearances and things in themselves. He also says that things in themselves exist, and that we have no knowledge of things in themselves. This could be labeled CLOSE TO NONSENSE, but we know Kant better than that. No matter how many laps on the track of metaphysics Kant takes us through, he is still widely held as one of the greatest modern philosophers of our time. Let us e
kant1 How does one label Kant as a philosopher? Is he a rationalist or an empiricist? Kant makes a distinction between appearances and things in themselves. He also says that things in themselves exist, and that we have no knowledge of things in themselves. This could be labeled CLOSE TO NONSENSE, but we know Kant better than that. No matter how many laps on the track of metaphysics Kant takes us through, he is still widely held as one of the greatest modern philosophers of our time. Let us e
Leibniz The Rationalism of Descartes and Leibniz By: Brent Blackman The Rationalism of Descartes and Leibniz Although philosophy rarely alters its direction and mood with sudden swings, there are times when its new concerns and emphases clearly separate it from its immediate past. Such was the case with seventeenth-century Continental rationalism, whose founder was Rene Descartes and whose new program initiated what is called modern philosophy. In a sense, much of what the Continental rationali
Life Introductory Essay About one year ago I had a life changing experience, a trip to a little town called Kerry on the outskirts of Dublin, Ireland. It was the most beautiful place that I have ever seen. Being in the presence of such beauty helped me see life from a different perspective. I was just going to be happy, appreciate what I have, be open-minded, not take anything for granted, and love everyone and everything. When I came back from Ireland I was truly happy, nothing could make me u
Life Introductory Essay About one year ago I had a life changing experience, a trip to a little town called Kerry on the outskirts of Dublin, Ireland. It was the most beautiful place that I have ever seen. Being in the presence of such beauty helped me see life from a different perspective. I was just going to be happy, appreciate what I have, be open-minded, not take anything for granted, and love everyone and everything. When I came back from Ireland I was truly happy, nothing could make me u
MR Politics of Plato and Aristotle To compare the political theories of two great philosophers of politics is to first examine each theory in depth. Plato is regarded by many experts as the first writer of political philosophy, and Aristotle is recognized as the first political scientist. These two men were great thinkers. They each had ideas of how to improve existing societies during their individual lifetimes. It is necessary to look at several areas of each theory to seek the difference in
my philosoph Education is inevitable. It is all around us because we can learn from virtually anything. When you are cooking, dancing, talking or any other activity you have actually had to learn several things to be able to do them. In the educational perspective, I am a pragmatist and I tend to follow after Deweys footsteps. The concept of Pragmatism is one that developed in the 20th century. My philosophy is based on the idea that learning should involve real-life situations. Learning becom
Mystery Cults Mystery cults greatly influenced the development of Pythagoreanism as Pythagoreans adopted many of their traditions, behaviors and beliefs. Pythagoras, the founder of the Pythagoreans, established a school in which he developed and taught these adopted cultural behaviors and beliefs. The nature of daily living in the school, both its moral and its intellectual disciplines, can perhaps best be understood as an intellectualized development from earlier mystery cults such as the Ele
None Provided9 Flux versus Permanence The two questions that are stated in the Heritage handout, are indeed two distinct questions. The question to be addressed is of the world being constituted primarily by flux or permanence. This question is significant because in modern society, I believe that there is no clear-cut answer, just a position somewhere in the middle, whereas the Presocratic philosopher, Pythagoras, philosophized that the world is constituted by permanence. Pythagoras is probabl
nonsense ENDURING, ENDEARING NONSENSE by Andrew Green Did you read and enjoy Lewis Carroll\'s Alice in Wonderland books as a child? Or better still, did you have someone read them to you? Perhaps you discovered them as an adult or, forbid the thought, maybe you haven\'t discovered them at all! Those who have journeyed Through the Looking Glass generally love (or shun) the tales for their unparalleled sense of nonsense . Public interest in the books--from the time they were published more than a
plato and forms Platos Forms By: Anonymous The influence that Plato, the Greek philosopher born in 427 BC in Athens, has had throughout the history of philosophy has been monumental. Among other things, Plato is known for his exploration of the fundamental problems of natural science, political theory, metaphysics, theology and theory of knowledge; many of his ideas becoming permanent elements in Western thought. The basis of Platos philosophy is his theory of Ideas, or doctrine of Forms. Whil
Platos Forms I. Introduction Purpose I intend to show the validity of Plato\'s arguments about his theory of Forms. Aristotle, along with others, cross-examines Plato\'s proposals. Yet, I happen to see the potential of his point of view and would like to take a deeper look into his theory. The purpose of this paper is to critically analyze the theory of Plato\'s Forms from his perspective and that of several others, including Aristotle. Topics The topics in which I will mainly focus on will be
platos works In his works, Plato writes about truth, justice, and reality in full detail. His ideas are greatly deep and persuasively argued. It is from him that all western philosophy is a footnote. He describes his view in a series of numerous dialogues. For my report, I have chosen four of his works to study, which I think were his most important. The Republic is a dialogue composed of 10 books. The theme in its entirety is justice. The characters of the dialogue are Socrates, who is the n
Pythagoras Pythagoras was a Greek philosopher that was responsible for some devolpments in mathematics. He was born around 560 B.C. and died around 480 B.C. He was originally from the city of Samos, Ionia(Later day Italy), but moved away from his home to escape the tyranny of Polycrates. Ionia was an area around the Mediterranean Sea and Samos was an island inside that area. From Samos he moved to the city of Croton. In Croton he established a school. The school was a philosophical and religiou
Pythagoras1 My name is Pythagoras of Samos. I believe I should win the fabulous two-week cruise on the incomparable Argo because I dedicated my life to educating and caring for the future generations. I risked my life to share my knowledge with anyone who wanted to learn. I was born on the island of Samos, but lived most of my life in Crotona, Italy. When I was a young man, I traveled to many different places to observe the different lifestyles and cultures. Some of the countries I visited were
Rene Descartes Once upon a time we were told of the earth being the center of the universe. The sun, moon, and all planets even unknown were all revolving around our planet. We now look at that statement and wonder in amazement how our species could have pondered such a thought. Through advanced mathematical and persistently working to prove his theory, Rene Descartes transformed yet another one of these worldly assumptions and proved it all wrong. Rene Descartes Method of Doubt was simply his
Rethinking Cogito Rethinking the Cogito It is the purpose of this essay to examine both Descartes’ Cogito argument and his skepticism towards small and universal elements, as well as the implications these arguments have on each other. First, I will summarize and explain the skepticism Descartes’ brings to bear on small and universal elements in his first meditation. Second, I will summarize and explain the Cogito argument, Descartes’ famous “I think, therefore I am” (it should be noted that th
sdfa The mathematical notion of infinity can be conceptualized in many different ways. First, as counting by hundreds for the rest of our lives, an endless quantity. It can also be thought of as digging a whole in hell for eternity, negative infinity. The concept I will explore, however, is infinitely smaller quantities, through radioactive decay Infinity is by definition an indefinitely large quantity. It is hard to grasp the magnitude of such an idea. When we examine infinity further by setti
Sigmund Freud A scale is a proportion used in determining the dimensional relationship of a representation to that which it represents. The scale we used for building our house is 1 inch = 3 feet. When you use a scale, you are making an exact model of a thing except it is an exact smaller version of the figure. For instance, if you have a scale of 1:3, when you enlarged the figure three times it would the real size of the figure. Scales can be used for making house, boat, and etc. models. When
Synthetic APriori Proposition Are There Synthetic A-Priori Propositions? From a logical point of view, the propositions that express human knowledge can be divided according to two distinctions. First is the distinction between propositions that are a priori, in the sense that they are knowable prior to experience, and those that are a posteriori, in the sense that they are knowable only after experience. Second is the distinction between propositions that are analytic, that is, those in which
The Origin of Ideas The Origins of Ideas Websters dictionary defines the word idea as 1) something, such as a thought or conception, that potentially or actually exists in the mind as a product of mental activity, 2) an opinion, a conviction, or a principle, 3) a plan, scheme, or method 4) the gist of a specific situation, and 5) a notion. We have a better understanding of these definitions today because of the thoughts and writings of Descartes and John Locke. These two have very different vi
The Rationalism of Descartes and Leibniz The Rationalism of Descartes and Leibniz Although philosophy rarely alters its direction and mood with sudden swings, there are times when its new concerns and emphases clearly separate it from its immediate past. Such was the case with seventeenth-century Continental rationalism, whose founder was Rene Descartes and whose new program initiated what is called modern philosophy. In a sense, much of what the Continental rationalists set out to do had alrea
Value of Philosophy What is the value of Philosophy? The word “philosophy” is derived from two ancient Greek words, “philos” meaning ‘love of’ and “sophia” meaning ‘wisdom’. Philosophers are lovers of wisdom. They have had the time and resources to sit back and wonder about what things really are like when all the pieces are fitted into one final accounting. The history of philosophy is generally divided into four stages or periods. Ancient philosophy covers Greek and Roman philosophy. Medieval
Western Philosphy Elisa Cristina Makoon-Singh February 27, 2001 Western Philosophy Harre believes that philosophy is the willingness to reflect on our reflections of the human situation. This belief is very relaxed. Harre wants answers, but he will allow them to come with time. Philosophy allows us to ask questions such as What is the purpose of human life, as well as Why do we seek a purpose for human life? Harre inquires whether we are soul of physique; and if we are both, how much of eac
What Is Wrong With Descartes Philosophy It is from the views of Descartes that most of the metaphysical systems of the last three centuries begin, trying to improve upon them, or to overcome what they regard as difficulties in the Cartesian system. René Descartes is responsible for the predominance of the problem of human knowledge in modern philosophy. Many of the systems of philosophy and theories of knowledge which have arisen in the last three centuries can trace their lineage directly to t
8 physisits Eight Scientist Research Since the dawn of time, man has yearned to know the origin of existence, how life was started, and the source of creation. Many scientists, from ancient Greece to modern civilization, began the search for answers by first studying our solar system, mapping the stars, trying to unlock their secrets. These eight scientists paved the way for any basic knowledge of the universe. Born in 270 BC, the Greek astronomer Aristarchus of Samos, was the first scientist k
A Century of Physics A Century of Physics By the end of the nineteenth century after more than two thousand years of intellectual struggle that began with the Greek philosophers, physical scientists had reason to believe that they were beginning to understand the universe. Their theories of matter and energy, of electricity and magnetism, of heat and sound and light were confirmed in laboratories throughout the world with increasing precision. Experimentation was the method and mathematics the
A simple understanding of physics A Simple Understanding of Physics Science is divided into many disciplines. One such division is physics. “The study of relations among observations we can make of the universe constitutes the body of science, and relations among observations of the physical universe constitutes the subject matter of physics.” (Adair, 25) It is plain to see from this description that physics does encompass a wide array of studies. The majority of physical phenomena investigated
Albert Einstein Albert Einstein, perhaps the greatest mind ever to have walked the face of the earth, was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Germany. As a boy, he hated school, and felt that the regimented and repetitive nature of schooling in Germany at that time had any promise of helping his future. He did not do well in school, mainly because he did not care to learn what was being taught to him. While he seemed to be a bright child, his schoolwork did not interest him, but at the same time the
Black Holes Black Holes: Infinity and Beyond If theories of their existence are true, black holes are the most powerful force in the known physical universe. Many people are familiar with the term black hole, but few people actually know anything about them. A black hole forms as a result of a massive star running out of fuel to burn (Chaisson, 193). Once the star is no longer exerting outward force by burning off gases, it begins to collapse under it’s own intense, inward gravity (Chaisson, 19
Einstein on Relativity The theories of relativity were revolutionary. Everybody agrees that Einstein brought about this revolution. Even the people that claim that Einstein just tweaked the theories of Lorentz and Poincaré, admit that Einstein was the first to recognize the physical meaning of the formulations. He understood that the terms and concepts like those of absolute space and absolute time must lose there meaning and other concepts had to replace them, if we were to be able to understa
Einstein1 Albert Einstein Einstein, Albert (1879-1955), was one of the greatest scientists of all time. He is best known for his theory of relativity, which he first advanced when he was only 26. He also made many other contributions to science. Einstein\'s relativity theory revolutionized scientific thought with new conceptions of time, space, mass, motion, and gravitation. He treated matter and energy as exchangeable, not distinct. In so doing, he laid the basis for controlling the release of
Eistein Relativity Einstein, Albert (1879-1955), was one of the greatest scientists of all time. He is best known for his theory of relativity, which he first advanced when he was only 26. He also made many other contributions to science. Relativity. Einstein\'s relativity theory revolutionized scientific thought with new conceptions of time, space, mass, motion, and gravitation. He treated matter and energy as exchangeable, not distinct. In so doing, he laid the basis for controlling the relea
Galileo Galilei On 15 Feb., 1564, in Pisa, Galileo was brought into this world. Little did his parents know he would change how people look at the world. His father, Vincenzo Galilei, studied music and carried out experiments to help him pay for his musical instruments. His mother, Giulia Ammannati, was a good housewife and stayed at home, taking care of the kids. As a child, Galileo was interested in the experiments his father conducted, and often helped him with the experiments. Besides being
Gravity I. Introduction Print section Gravitation, the force of attraction between all objects that tends to pull them toward one another. It is a universal force, affecting the largest and smallest objects, all forms of matter, and energy. Gravitation governs the motion of astronomical bodies. It keeps the moon in orbit around the earth and keeps the earth and the other planets of the solar system in orbit around the sun. On a larger scale, it governs the motion of stars and slows the outward